Suzy (1936)

90 or 95 mins | Melodrama | 24 July 1936

Director:

George Fitzmaurice

Producer:

Maurice Revnes

Cinematographer:

Ray June

Editor:

George Boemler

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

According to a news item in HR on 24 Nov 1934, M-G-M purchased Herbert Gorman's novel shortly its after publication for $15,000. News items in HR from May through Sep 1935 note that Philip Wylie was the first writer assigned to work on the script, successively followed by John C. Higgins, Herman Mankiewicz , Erskine Gwynne and Ernest Vajda. None of these writers are credited onscreen, in reviews or in SAB , and the extent of their participation in the released film has not been determined. According to SAB , William Anthony McGuire was a contributing writer, but did not want to be credited. A HR news item on 3 Jul 1936 noted that Doris Lind had been engaged by M-G-M to write new scenes for the picture after unfavorable out-of-town previews convinced studio executives to reshoot portions of it. Norbert Brodine was borrowed from Universal to shoot the added scenes because cameraman Ray June was ill. A HR news item in Mar 1936 mentioned that Clark Gable was initially to star in the picture. Suzy was the only film in which Cary Grant and Jean Harlow appeared together. The scene in which Harlow's character sings "Did I Remember" and is joined by Grant's character, is frequently shown in documentaries about their respective ... More Less

According to a news item in HR on 24 Nov 1934, M-G-M purchased Herbert Gorman's novel shortly its after publication for $15,000. News items in HR from May through Sep 1935 note that Philip Wylie was the first writer assigned to work on the script, successively followed by John C. Higgins, Herman Mankiewicz , Erskine Gwynne and Ernest Vajda. None of these writers are credited onscreen, in reviews or in SAB , and the extent of their participation in the released film has not been determined. According to SAB , William Anthony McGuire was a contributing writer, but did not want to be credited. A HR news item on 3 Jul 1936 noted that Doris Lind had been engaged by M-G-M to write new scenes for the picture after unfavorable out-of-town previews convinced studio executives to reshoot portions of it. Norbert Brodine was borrowed from Universal to shoot the added scenes because cameraman Ray June was ill. A HR news item in Mar 1936 mentioned that Clark Gable was initially to star in the picture. Suzy was the only film in which Cary Grant and Jean Harlow appeared together. The scene in which Harlow's character sings "Did I Remember" and is joined by Grant's character, is frequently shown in documentaries about their respective careers. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Jul 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
14 Jul 36
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 34
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
10 May 35
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jul 35
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 35
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Sep 35
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 36
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jul 36
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jul 36
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jul 36
p.
Motion Picture Daily
10 Jul 36
p. 11.
Motion Picture Herald
13 Jun 36
p. 40.
Motion Picture Herald
18 Jul 36
p. 52, 54
New York Times
25 Jul 36
p. 16.
Variety
29 Jul 36
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
New scenes wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Added scenes photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Suzy by Herbert Gorman (New York, 1934).
SONGS
"Did I Remember (To Tell You I Adored You)," music by Walter Donaldson, lyrics by Harold Adamson.
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 July 1936
Production Date:
6 April--29 May 1936
retakes early July 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
21 July 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6488
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90 or 95
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2383
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

On the eve of World War I, Suzy Trent, an American show girl working in London, loses her job when the show closes and resolves to marry an aristocrat. One day, she is bumped by a chauffeur-driven car, and the "lord" offers to give her a ride home, but she soon discovers that he is actually a poor inventor named Terry Moore. Despite Terry's poverty, Suzy falls in love with him, and accompanies him to a factory, where each night he secretly works on his new invention, an airplane stabilizer. When his employer, Mrs. Schmidt arrives, she angrily tells them to leave but does not see Suzy, who has hidden. Suzy then hears Mrs. Schmidt and another woman and man talking in German, but does not understand them. When Terry returns for Suzy, Schmidt sees him and, worried that he knows that they are spies, sweetly offers him a job as plant manager to keep him quiet. An elated Terry then proposes to Suzy, and they quickly marry. When they return to her place to pack, Mrs. Schmidt's female cohort follows them and shoots Terry. Terrified because Terry appears to be dead and another tenant calls the police to report that Suzy killed him, she runs away. She then goes to Paris to see her friend Maisie and gets a job as a singer in a cabaret. There she meets Andre Charville, an "ace" flyer who is attracted to her. They fall in love that night and immediately marry. One week later, Andre takes her home to his father, the Baron Charville, who is accustomed to Andre's impulsiveness, but ... +


On the eve of World War I, Suzy Trent, an American show girl working in London, loses her job when the show closes and resolves to marry an aristocrat. One day, she is bumped by a chauffeur-driven car, and the "lord" offers to give her a ride home, but she soon discovers that he is actually a poor inventor named Terry Moore. Despite Terry's poverty, Suzy falls in love with him, and accompanies him to a factory, where each night he secretly works on his new invention, an airplane stabilizer. When his employer, Mrs. Schmidt arrives, she angrily tells them to leave but does not see Suzy, who has hidden. Suzy then hears Mrs. Schmidt and another woman and man talking in German, but does not understand them. When Terry returns for Suzy, Schmidt sees him and, worried that he knows that they are spies, sweetly offers him a job as plant manager to keep him quiet. An elated Terry then proposes to Suzy, and they quickly marry. When they return to her place to pack, Mrs. Schmidt's female cohort follows them and shoots Terry. Terrified because Terry appears to be dead and another tenant calls the police to report that Suzy killed him, she runs away. She then goes to Paris to see her friend Maisie and gets a job as a singer in a cabaret. There she meets Andre Charville, an "ace" flyer who is attracted to her. They fall in love that night and immediately marry. One week later, Andre takes her home to his father, the Baron Charville, who is accustomed to Andre's impulsiveness, but is not happy with the marriage. When Andre's leave is suddenly cancelled, Suzy stays at his father's house. Soon her kindness and devotion to Andre impresses the baron and they become very fond of each other. While Andre is acclaimed as a national hero, it becomes apparent that he has been having affairs with other women, particularly a certain Madame Diane Eyrelle. Suzy is miserable without him, and when he gets a leave, his father has to beg him to be kind to Suzy. After Andre returns to the front, Suzy pretends to be happy for the baron's sake and each day reads the supposed contents of Andre's letters to her, even though he never writes. Meanwhile, in England, Terry, who was only wounded in the shooting, has become successful as the inventor of the stabilizer. As part of his work, he is asked to fly some planes over to Andre, unaware of his connection to Suzy. Because Andre has been wounded, Suzy goes to visit him and she and Terry run into each other in the hospital. They are both shocked, but pretend not to know each other. She later feels that she must tell Andre eveything. When she goes back to Andre's room, she sees him kissing someone, but does not know that the woman is Mme. Eyrelle. Suzy then goes to Terry who is initially angry, but soon promises to set her free from their marriage. When he meets Mme. Eyrelle, neither can remember where they have met before, but later, when Suzy sees a picture of Mme. Eyrelle in a magazine, she recognizes her as the woman at Mrs. Schmidt's factory. Suzy goes to Terry with the information and he agrees to help her. They then go to Andre, who has recuperated and is visiting Mme. Eyrelle's chateau. When the spy is exposed, one of her followers shoots Andre. Andre then asks Terry to fly his planned mission for him and begs for Suzy's forgiveness before he dies. Terry's mission is a success, but returning to the airfield, his plane crashes near the chateau. Knowing that the baron would be heartbroken to find that his son died because of his involvement with a spy, Suzy convinces Terry to place Andre's body in the plane and make it appear that he has died heroically. A short time later, at a ceremony honoring Andre, a German aviator flies overhead and drops a bouquet of flowers, after which Terry escorts Suzy back to Paris. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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