Andy Hardy Gets Spring Fever (1939)

85 or 87 mins | Comedy-drama | 21 July 1939

Director:

W. S. Van Dyke

Writer:

Kay Van Riper

Cinematographer:

Lester White

Editor:

Ben Lewis

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The opening credits read, "Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer presents Judge Hardy's Family," with a photograph of the four "Hardy Family" members superimposed with their respective character names and the names of the actors who portray them. According to a news item in HR, director W. S. Van Dyke innovated a new camera technique on the picture in which he used a mobile camera boom on every shot instead of a tripod, requiring ten men to work on photography. M-G-M publicity materials for the film note that the reason why the mobile camera was used was to save time between takes. This was was first Hardy Family film for Van Dyke. The first six films were all directed by George B. Seitz. Seitz returned to the series for the next film, Andy Hardy Meets Debutante (see entry). News items also note that this was the debut film of Diane Quillan, the youngest member of the Quillan acting family, although her participation in the released film has not been confirmed. It was also the first film of Helen Gilbert, formerly a member of M-G-M's studio orchestra. Another news item mentioned that forty local high school students worked on the set of the picture as "Mickey Rooney's school pals," and that they continued to take classes on the M-G-M lot during filming. Actor Sidney Miller, who also portayed the character "Sidney Miller," and Ivan Miller, who portrayed his father, "Mr. Miller," were father and son in real life. For additional information on films in the Hardy Family series, see the entry below for A Family Affair and consult the Series Index. ...

More Less

The opening credits read, "Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer presents Judge Hardy's Family," with a photograph of the four "Hardy Family" members superimposed with their respective character names and the names of the actors who portray them. According to a news item in HR, director W. S. Van Dyke innovated a new camera technique on the picture in which he used a mobile camera boom on every shot instead of a tripod, requiring ten men to work on photography. M-G-M publicity materials for the film note that the reason why the mobile camera was used was to save time between takes. This was was first Hardy Family film for Van Dyke. The first six films were all directed by George B. Seitz. Seitz returned to the series for the next film, Andy Hardy Meets Debutante (see entry). News items also note that this was the debut film of Diane Quillan, the youngest member of the Quillan acting family, although her participation in the released film has not been confirmed. It was also the first film of Helen Gilbert, formerly a member of M-G-M's studio orchestra. Another news item mentioned that forty local high school students worked on the set of the picture as "Mickey Rooney's school pals," and that they continued to take classes on the M-G-M lot during filming. Actor Sidney Miller, who also portayed the character "Sidney Miller," and Ivan Miller, who portrayed his father, "Mr. Miller," were father and son in real life. For additional information on films in the Hardy Family series, see the entry below for A Family Affair and consult the Series Index.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Jul 1939
p. 3
Film Daily
12 Jul 1939
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
4 Apr 1939
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
8 Apr 1939
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
12 Apr 1939
p. 13
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 1939
p. 9
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 1939
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
21 Apr 1939
pp. 6-7
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 1939
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
16 May 1939
p. 6
Motion Picture Daily
11 Jul 1939
p. 7
Motion Picture Herald
15 Jul 1939
pp. 53-54
New York Times
19 Jul 1939
p. 23
Variety
12 Jul 1939
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
W. S. Van Dyke II
Dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Aurania Rouverol.
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 July 1939
Production Date:
3 Apr--1 May 1939; retakes in mid May 1939
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
18 July 1939
LP9060
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
85 or 87
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
5365
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

As winter disappears in Carvel, usually serious-minded Judge James K. Hardy finds himself gazing out his courtroom window and thinking of spring. After court is recessed, the judge is visited by chemist Mark Hansen and promoter James Willis, who inform him that some gravelly land previously thought worthless and set aside for an acqueduct that was never built, is actually rich in bauxite, a mineral needed to make aluminum. Though the men want to start to work reclaiming the bauxite right away, the judge decides to get a sample of the soil himself and have it independently analyzed. That same day, the judge's teenage son Andy is snubbed by his girl friend, Polly Benedict, who has a crush on Ensign Charles Copley, who is working in Carvel. Andy's hurt feelings are soon alleviated by Rose Meredith, a new, young drama teacher at Carvel High, on whom Andy develops a tremendous crush. Soon the judge's chemical report comes back revealing that the soil sample is what Hansen and Willis claimed it was. He then excitedly decides to invest his own money and urge friends to capitalize on the venture as well. Soon Marian Hardy, the judge's daughter, who wants to become a career woman, gets a job as Hansen and Willis' secretary. As the weeks pass, while the judge and his friends anticipate great profits from the bauxite and Marian works at the office, Andy works hard to impress Miss Meredith in rehearsals for the school play. One day, Marian comes home from the office and informs her father that Willis and Hansen have secretly left town with all of the money earmarked for ...

More Less

As winter disappears in Carvel, usually serious-minded Judge James K. Hardy finds himself gazing out his courtroom window and thinking of spring. After court is recessed, the judge is visited by chemist Mark Hansen and promoter James Willis, who inform him that some gravelly land previously thought worthless and set aside for an acqueduct that was never built, is actually rich in bauxite, a mineral needed to make aluminum. Though the men want to start to work reclaiming the bauxite right away, the judge decides to get a sample of the soil himself and have it independently analyzed. That same day, the judge's teenage son Andy is snubbed by his girl friend, Polly Benedict, who has a crush on Ensign Charles Copley, who is working in Carvel. Andy's hurt feelings are soon alleviated by Rose Meredith, a new, young drama teacher at Carvel High, on whom Andy develops a tremendous crush. Soon the judge's chemical report comes back revealing that the soil sample is what Hansen and Willis claimed it was. He then excitedly decides to invest his own money and urge friends to capitalize on the venture as well. Soon Marian Hardy, the judge's daughter, who wants to become a career woman, gets a job as Hansen and Willis' secretary. As the weeks pass, while the judge and his friends anticipate great profits from the bauxite and Marian works at the office, Andy works hard to impress Miss Meredith in rehearsals for the school play. One day, Marian comes home from the office and informs her father that Willis and Hansen have secretly left town with all of the money earmarked for the project. Knowing that he has been duped and feeling guilty that he urged friends to join him in the venture, the judge decides to call a meeting of the share holders to confess everything. Just before the meeting, however, he learns that the city is anxious to buy the gravel on the land for a new highway. Although he still blames himself for the near financial disaster, his friends hold themselves equally responsible and are happy to learn that the gravel sale will enable them to break even on their investments. Later that day, Andy announces that he plans to quit school and marry Miss Meredith, to whom he has just proposed. Though his father gently tries to warn him about the problems he will encounter, Andy is convinced that his situation will work out. Miss Meredith, who was touched by Andy's proposal, tells him that she will give him an answer after the school play. During the intermission, however, when Andy sees her kiss her fiancé, who has just come to visit her, he realizes that she will not marry him. Though hurt, Andy continues in the play. Finally, after the play is greeted with applause by the audience, Polly goes to Andy to make up and the entire Hardy family happily return home.

Less

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Teenage, Domestic


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

The Black Cauldron

According to production notes in AMPAS library files, The Black Cauldron took twelve years to complete, and began in 1971 when Walt Disney Pictures, Inc., bought the ... >>

An American Tail

The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant JoAnn Yao, a student at ... >>

The Great Mouse Detective

According to a 20 Jun 1986 Back Stage article, animator Eric Larson, the last of Walt Disney’s “Nine Old Men” from his original stable of artists, served ... >>

The Secret of NIMH

The character of the gatekeeper, “Brutus,” is not credited among the onscreen “voice talents,” as he has no spoken lines.
       Contemporary sources referred to the film throughout production as ... >>

Mother's Cry

An item in the 26 March 1930 Variety announced that Helen Grace Carlisle, author of the 1930 novel Mother’s Cry, had entered into a writing ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.