Ann Carver's Profession (1933)

68 or 71 mins | Drama | 26 May 1933

Director:

Edward Buzzell

Writer:

Robert Riskin

Cinematographer:

Ted Tetzlaff

Editor:

Maurice Wright

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Rules for Wives and Professional Women. According to the onscreen credits, Robert Riskin's original story was also entitled "Rules for Wives." According to FD news items, Norman Foster and Edwin Stanley were cast to appear in the film, but their participation in the completed picture has not been confirmed. Although the writing credits differ, this film bears a striking resemblance in plot to Columbia's 1938 production The Lady Objects (see entry). ...

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The working titles of this film were Rules for Wives and Professional Women. According to the onscreen credits, Robert Riskin's original story was also entitled "Rules for Wives." According to FD news items, Norman Foster and Edwin Stanley were cast to appear in the film, but their participation in the completed picture has not been confirmed. Although the writing credits differ, this film bears a striking resemblance in plot to Columbia's 1938 production The Lady Objects (see entry).

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
Personal note credit:
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
27 Mar 1933
p. 4
Film Daily
5 Apr 1933
p. 6
Film Daily
22 Apr 1933
p. 3
Film Daily
9 Jun 1933
p. 6
International Photographer
1 May 1933
p. 25
Motion Picture Daily
9 Jun 1933
p. 11
Motion Picture Herald
17 Jun 1933
p. 37
New York Times
9 Jun 1933
p. 20
Variety
13 Jun 1933
p. 15
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Professional Women
Rules for Wives
Release Date:
26 May 1933
Production Date:
23 Mar--11 Apr 1933
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp.
22 May 1933
LP3900
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
68 or 71
Length(in feet):
6,234
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Popular football star "Lightning" Bill Graham marries Ann Carver after both graduate from Hampden University. Although Ann receives her law degree and passes the bar exam, she decides to keep house for Bill, who is employed as a draftsman. Although Bill is ambitious to prove himself beyond his football talent, attractive looks and good singing voice, it is actually Ann who becomes successful. After proving herself to former Judge Bingham and his son by handling an important case, she is hired by them and wins an acquittal for a client's wealthy playboy son in a breach of promise lawsuit filed against him. Other spectacular legal victories follow, and Ann becomes the darling of the media, while Bill's career stagnates. As Ann's job makes enormous demands on her time, she and Bill spend less time together. Ashamed that his wife's income provides most of the family money, Bill quits his job to earn more crooning at the Club Mirador, a nightclub where their college friend, Jim Thompson, is a band leader. When Ann mistakenly believes that her husband is romantically inclined toward the club's sexy, alcoholic singer, Carole Rogers, Ann publicly embarrasses him. Unable to cope with the idea that he cannot support his wife, Bill leaves and moves into his own apartment, where Carole, having lost her job due to her alcoholism, continues to make a play for him. Disgusted with her alcoholic condition, Bill leaves for the club. Her drunkenness causes her to fall, and her necklace catches on a sofa, choking her to death. Bill finally makes the headlines as the district attorney's office accuses him of murder. Judge Bingham convinces ...

More Less

Popular football star "Lightning" Bill Graham marries Ann Carver after both graduate from Hampden University. Although Ann receives her law degree and passes the bar exam, she decides to keep house for Bill, who is employed as a draftsman. Although Bill is ambitious to prove himself beyond his football talent, attractive looks and good singing voice, it is actually Ann who becomes successful. After proving herself to former Judge Bingham and his son by handling an important case, she is hired by them and wins an acquittal for a client's wealthy playboy son in a breach of promise lawsuit filed against him. Other spectacular legal victories follow, and Ann becomes the darling of the media, while Bill's career stagnates. As Ann's job makes enormous demands on her time, she and Bill spend less time together. Ashamed that his wife's income provides most of the family money, Bill quits his job to earn more crooning at the Club Mirador, a nightclub where their college friend, Jim Thompson, is a band leader. When Ann mistakenly believes that her husband is romantically inclined toward the club's sexy, alcoholic singer, Carole Rogers, Ann publicly embarrasses him. Unable to cope with the idea that he cannot support his wife, Bill leaves and moves into his own apartment, where Carole, having lost her job due to her alcoholism, continues to make a play for him. Disgusted with her alcoholic condition, Bill leaves for the club. Her drunkenness causes her to fall, and her necklace catches on a sofa, choking her to death. Bill finally makes the headlines as the district attorney's office accuses him of murder. Judge Bingham convinces Bill to let Ann plead his case. She eloquently tells the jury that Bill's troubles are her fault and that he left her when she did not return the love he had given her so willingly. Announcing before the court that this will be her last case, she begs the jury not to convict Bill and claims that reasonable doubt exists in this case. After Bill is acquitted, he and Ann reconcile. As Ann cheerfully helps her husband pursue his career, Bill becomes successful as an architect when his plans are published in House and Garden and Vanity Fair .

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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