The Bold Caballero (1936)

56, 60 or 71-72 mins | Drama | 1 December 1936

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HISTORY

The working titles for this film were The Mask of Zorro and The Beloved Rogue . This film was based on Johnston McCulley's character of Zorro, which first appeared in McCulley's story "The Curse of Capistrano" in All-Story Weekly (9 Aug-6 Sep 1919). Although onscreen credits state "Idea by Johnston McCulley"--suggesting that he contributed only to the screen treatment--and credit Wells Root with an original screenplay, a modern source credits McCulley and Root as co-screenwriters. Another modern source says this film is based on McCulley's story "The Return of Zorro." The Bold Caballero was Republic's first all-color feature. The film was screened in Lincoln, NE, the week of 8 Mar 1937 at a length of 60 minutes, as compared to the original length of 71-72 minutes. "The Curse of Capistrano" was published in book form under the title The Mark of Zorro in 1924. Among adaptations of McCulley's story is the 1920 film The Mark of Zorro , which was produced by Douglas Fairbanks Picture Corp., directed by Fred Niblo, and starred Douglas Fairbanks (see below); for a list of other "Zorro" films consult that entry. In 1974, 20th Century-Fox Television produced a version of The Mark of Zorro , directed by Don McDougall and starring Frank Langella and Ricardo Montalban. Modern sources list the following additional cast members: John Merton, Jack Kirk, Vinegar Roan, George Plues, Henry Morris, Chief Thunder Cloud, Pascale Perry, Jack Roberts, William Emile, Gurdial Singh, Steve Clark, Herman Hack, Rube Dalroy, Bill Wolfe, Si Jenks, Harrison Greene, Jimmy Aubrey, Jack Rockwell, Artie Ortego, Dick Botiller, Wally West, Ed Phillips , Sherry Tansey, ... More Less

The working titles for this film were The Mask of Zorro and The Beloved Rogue . This film was based on Johnston McCulley's character of Zorro, which first appeared in McCulley's story "The Curse of Capistrano" in All-Story Weekly (9 Aug-6 Sep 1919). Although onscreen credits state "Idea by Johnston McCulley"--suggesting that he contributed only to the screen treatment--and credit Wells Root with an original screenplay, a modern source credits McCulley and Root as co-screenwriters. Another modern source says this film is based on McCulley's story "The Return of Zorro." The Bold Caballero was Republic's first all-color feature. The film was screened in Lincoln, NE, the week of 8 Mar 1937 at a length of 60 minutes, as compared to the original length of 71-72 minutes. "The Curse of Capistrano" was published in book form under the title The Mark of Zorro in 1924. Among adaptations of McCulley's story is the 1920 film The Mark of Zorro , which was produced by Douglas Fairbanks Picture Corp., directed by Fred Niblo, and starred Douglas Fairbanks (see below); for a list of other "Zorro" films consult that entry. In 1974, 20th Century-Fox Television produced a version of The Mark of Zorro , directed by Don McDougall and starring Frank Langella and Ricardo Montalban. Modern sources list the following additional cast members: John Merton, Jack Kirk, Vinegar Roan, George Plues, Henry Morris, Chief Thunder Cloud, Pascale Perry, Jack Roberts, William Emile, Gurdial Singh, Steve Clark, Herman Hack, Rube Dalroy, Bill Wolfe, Si Jenks, Harrison Greene, Jimmy Aubrey, Jack Rockwell, Artie Ortego, Dick Botiller, Wally West, Ed Phillips , Sherry Tansey, Henry Hall, Ben Corbett and Bud McClure. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 Nov 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
3 Dec 36
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 36
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 36
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Nov 36
p. 4.
Motion Picture Daily
24 Nov 36
p. 20.
Motion Picture Herald
24 Oct 36
p. 44.
Motion Picture Herald
5 Dec 36
p. 46.
The Exhibitor
15 Dec 1936.
---
Variety
23 Nov 36
p. 3.
Variety
17 Mar 37
p. 15.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Beloved Rogue
The Mask of Zorro
Release Date:
1 December 1936
Production Date:
began 15 September 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
4 January 1937
Copyright Number:
LP6831
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Magnacolor
Duration(in mins):
56, 60 or 71-72
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2681
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Zorro, the masked deliverer of Indians of Spanish-ruled California, is about to be hanged when General Palma is declared governor of Santa Cruz. Palma is to replace the tyrannical commandante, Sebastian Golle, who has been pilfering King Charles' tax money and terrorizing the natives. With the help of the Indians, Zorro escapes and, posing as Don Diego Vega, a gentleman pauper from Mexico, offers his services to Palma and his lovely daughter Isabella. Palma, however, refuses Diego and unwittingly sends him out as bait for Zorro. But as Palma chases the elusive hero, he is killed by a bandit who leaves Zorro's "Z" mark on his dead body. After Isabella is made governor, Golle plans to marry her and receive Santa Cruz as her dowery, and Diego agrees to do his wooing for him. Golle, meanwhile, has been taxing the Indians beyond their means and enslaving the sons of those who cannot pay. When Golle's soldiers herd the slaves into the public square, their mothers cry for Zorro to deliver them. Hoping to expose Golle's barbarism, Diego brings Isabella to the square, where she promises to free the slaves once information on Zorro's whereabouts is brought to her and offers a public bounty of two hundred pieces of gold for the outlaw. Zorro, however, steals the gold and buys the slaves' freedom himself. Then, on Isabella's birthday, Golle stages a burlesque bullfight in which a child is placed in the ring, hoping to lure Zorro out of hiding. When Isabella pleads with the foppish Diego to save the child, he fights the bull bravely and adeptly, revealing his true virility and love ... +


Zorro, the masked deliverer of Indians of Spanish-ruled California, is about to be hanged when General Palma is declared governor of Santa Cruz. Palma is to replace the tyrannical commandante, Sebastian Golle, who has been pilfering King Charles' tax money and terrorizing the natives. With the help of the Indians, Zorro escapes and, posing as Don Diego Vega, a gentleman pauper from Mexico, offers his services to Palma and his lovely daughter Isabella. Palma, however, refuses Diego and unwittingly sends him out as bait for Zorro. But as Palma chases the elusive hero, he is killed by a bandit who leaves Zorro's "Z" mark on his dead body. After Isabella is made governor, Golle plans to marry her and receive Santa Cruz as her dowery, and Diego agrees to do his wooing for him. Golle, meanwhile, has been taxing the Indians beyond their means and enslaving the sons of those who cannot pay. When Golle's soldiers herd the slaves into the public square, their mothers cry for Zorro to deliver them. Hoping to expose Golle's barbarism, Diego brings Isabella to the square, where she promises to free the slaves once information on Zorro's whereabouts is brought to her and offers a public bounty of two hundred pieces of gold for the outlaw. Zorro, however, steals the gold and buys the slaves' freedom himself. Then, on Isabella's birthday, Golle stages a burlesque bullfight in which a child is placed in the ring, hoping to lure Zorro out of hiding. When Isabella pleads with the foppish Diego to save the child, he fights the bull bravely and adeptly, revealing his true virility and love for Isabella. Seeing them kiss, Golle accuses Diego of betraying him, and Diego fends off Golle and his soldiers and escapes. When Zorro's mark is found on Golle's wounded body, Isabella finally realizes Diego is Zorro and escapes from Golle's clutches to capture him, still determined to avenge her father's murder. Golle captures them both, however, and fatally whips Isabella's female companion, planning to blame her death on Zorro. When Zorro finds the woman marred with the same backwards "Z" found on Palma, Isabella finally realizes it was Golle who killed her father. Just as Zorro is about to be hanged, the natives stage an uprising and help him defeat Golle. Zorro's loyal priest then blesses Isabella and Zorro, and the couple falls through the gallows box and kisses. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.