Grand Exit (1935)

67-68 or 70 mins | Mystery | 25 October 1935

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HISTORY

According to information found in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, this story was first considered for developement at Paramount in 1934. When that studio submitted the original script to the PCA, it was rejected "because of the great emphasis throughout the story upon inceniarism." Paramount then presented written statements from the Traveler's Fire Insurance Co. and the Los Angeles Fire Department to the PCA, in an attempt to assure them that the proposed film would not demonstrate how to commit an arson fire, as "it is physically impossible to set fires in the manner we delineate." When Columbia took over the project in 1935, the PCA dropped its original objections, and showed concern only for language, alcohol usage and other minor ... More Less

According to information found in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, this story was first considered for developement at Paramount in 1934. When that studio submitted the original script to the PCA, it was rejected "because of the great emphasis throughout the story upon inceniarism." Paramount then presented written statements from the Traveler's Fire Insurance Co. and the Los Angeles Fire Department to the PCA, in an attempt to assure them that the proposed film would not demonstrate how to commit an arson fire, as "it is physically impossible to set fires in the manner we delineate." When Columbia took over the project in 1935, the PCA dropped its original objections, and showed concern only for language, alcohol usage and other minor details. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
11 Nov 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
5 Nov 35
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Nov 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Nov 35
p. 11.
Motion Picture Daily
21 Oct 35
p. 17.
New York Times
4 Nov 35
p. 24.
Variety
13 Nov 35
p. 16..
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Lois Lindsey
Dell Henderson
Tom Francis
Monty Vandegrift
Earl M. Pingree
Jack Gray
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
SOUND
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 October 1935
Production Date:
5 August--4 September 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 October 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5864
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
67-68 or 70
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1525
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Tom Fletcher may be an irresponsible ladies' man, but he is also the best fire investigator in the country. He is hired by the Interoceanic Fire Insurance Company to investigate a series of financially disastrous fires. Tom takes the job on the condition that he receive exorbitant perks and that his friend, John Grayson, be retained as the acting chief investigator. No sooner does Tom take the job than the Acme Fur company explodes into flames. As he investigates the scene, Tom meets Adrienne Martin, an attractive young woman who has been seen at numerous other fires. They are immediately attracted to one another, and John, also smitten by Adrienne, warns her that Tom is a Casanova. Tom discovers that all the fires were started by an arsonist disguised as a telephone repairman, and informs the insurance company of this. He then discovers that Adrienne has run a mysterious personal ad in the newspaper warning "F" not to use the phone again. At another fire, Tom discovers that the fire was set using a magnifying glass manufactured by the now-defunct Maxwell Company. Tom learns that the company went under when Interoceanic refused a loan to its owner, Erwin Maxwell, who swore revenge. Maxwell then committed suicide, though his body was never found. Tom searches Adrienne's apartment, and finds a passport in the name of Adeline Maxwell. He accuses her of being Maxwell's daughter, and has her confined to the mental ward of a hospital. Adrienne is sent a basket of fruit with the note "A--I got you into this and I'll get you out--F." Tom disguises himself ... +


Tom Fletcher may be an irresponsible ladies' man, but he is also the best fire investigator in the country. He is hired by the Interoceanic Fire Insurance Company to investigate a series of financially disastrous fires. Tom takes the job on the condition that he receive exorbitant perks and that his friend, John Grayson, be retained as the acting chief investigator. No sooner does Tom take the job than the Acme Fur company explodes into flames. As he investigates the scene, Tom meets Adrienne Martin, an attractive young woman who has been seen at numerous other fires. They are immediately attracted to one another, and John, also smitten by Adrienne, warns her that Tom is a Casanova. Tom discovers that all the fires were started by an arsonist disguised as a telephone repairman, and informs the insurance company of this. He then discovers that Adrienne has run a mysterious personal ad in the newspaper warning "F" not to use the phone again. At another fire, Tom discovers that the fire was set using a magnifying glass manufactured by the now-defunct Maxwell Company. Tom learns that the company went under when Interoceanic refused a loan to its owner, Erwin Maxwell, who swore revenge. Maxwell then committed suicide, though his body was never found. Tom searches Adrienne's apartment, and finds a passport in the name of Adeline Maxwell. He accuses her of being Maxwell's daughter, and has her confined to the mental ward of a hospital. Adrienne is sent a basket of fruit with the note "A--I got you into this and I'll get you out--F." Tom disguises himself as an orderly on the ward, where he witnesses a patient sneak into the paint room, which suddenly bursts into flames. Tom catches the arsonist, who turns out to be Erwin Maxwell. With the case solved, Tom fixes John up with Adrienne, who admits that she must be a little crazy, and tells Tom that he's a lucky man to have escaped her without being burned. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.