Dumbbells in Ermine (1930)

57 mins | Comedy-drama | 14 May 1930

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HISTORY

The 23 Sep 1929 Film Daily announced the title, considered provisional at the time, as an upcoming production from Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. The screenplay was based on the 1925 play, Weak Sisters by Lynn Starling. On 14 Jan 1930, Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today reported that co-star James Gleason had completed writing dialogue for the film. The 30 Mar 1930 Film Daily also credited screenwriter Harvey Thew with contributing dialogue. The 18 Jan 1930 Hollywood Filmograph and 29 Jan 1930 Var included Marie Astaire and Florence Frederici among the cast, although their roles were not specified. Principal photography began 1 Feb 1930, according to the 15 Feb 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World. Five weeks later, the 22 Mar 1930 Hollywood Filmograph stated that editing was underway.
       Dumbells in Ermine opened 14 May 1930 to tepid reviews. Although critics expressed little enthusiasm for the screenplay, several commended the cast. The Jun 1930 Educational Screen determined the picture to be unsuitable for children under fifteen years of age. An item in the 13 Sep 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World noted only fair public response.
The Var review listed the film's title as Dumb-bells in Ermine. ...

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The 23 Sep 1929 Film Daily announced the title, considered provisional at the time, as an upcoming production from Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. The screenplay was based on the 1925 play, Weak Sisters by Lynn Starling. On 14 Jan 1930, Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today reported that co-star James Gleason had completed writing dialogue for the film. The 30 Mar 1930 Film Daily also credited screenwriter Harvey Thew with contributing dialogue. The 18 Jan 1930 Hollywood Filmograph and 29 Jan 1930 Var included Marie Astaire and Florence Frederici among the cast, although their roles were not specified. Principal photography began 1 Feb 1930, according to the 15 Feb 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World. Five weeks later, the 22 Mar 1930 Hollywood Filmograph stated that editing was underway.
       Dumbells in Ermine opened 14 May 1930 to tepid reviews. Although critics expressed little enthusiasm for the screenplay, several commended the cast. The Jun 1930 Educational Screen determined the picture to be unsuitable for children under fifteen years of age. An item in the 13 Sep 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World noted only fair public response.
The Var review listed the film's title as Dumb-bells in Ermine.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Educational Screen
Jun 1930
p. 176
Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today
14 Jan 1930
p. 4
Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today
30 Jan 1930
p. 8
Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures Today
11 Mar 1930
p. 1
Exhibitors Herald-World
15 Feb 1930
p. 54
Exhibitors Herald-World
13 Sep 1930
p. 65
Film Daily
23 Sep 1929
p. 11
Film Daily
30 Mar 1930
---
Film Daily
27 Jul 1930
---
Hollywood Fillmograph
18 Jan 1930
p. 14
Hollywood Fillmograph
22 Mar 1930
p. 18
Hollywood Fillmograph
5 Apr 1930
p. 21
Motion Picture News
7 Jun 1930
p. 135
New York Times
28 Jul 1930
p. 22
Talking Screen
Jul 1930
p. 59
Variety
29 Jan 1930
p. 32
Variety
5 Nov 1930
p. 30
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Dumb-Bells in Ermine
Release Date:
14 May 1930
Production Date:
began 1 Feb 1930
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
23 April 1930
LP1251
Physical Properties:
Sound
Vitaphone
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Also si.
Duration(in mins):
57
Length(in feet):
6,300
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In a small Virginia town, Faith Corey, daughter of a socially prominent family, meets and falls in love with Jerry Malone, a prizefighter. However, Faith's straitlaced mother wants her to marry Siegfried, a spellbinding "missionary reformer." While Grandma Corey promotes the romance with Malone, Mike, the fighter's hardboiled, wisecracking manager, tries to keep them apart. Following a quarrel, Faith reconciles herself to marrying Siegfried. He invites a group of "weak sisters" to a revival meeting, and is disgraced when one accuses him of her downfall. Finally, with Mike's advice, Jerry wins back Faith and they are united with the family's ...

More Less

In a small Virginia town, Faith Corey, daughter of a socially prominent family, meets and falls in love with Jerry Malone, a prizefighter. However, Faith's straitlaced mother wants her to marry Siegfried, a spellbinding "missionary reformer." While Grandma Corey promotes the romance with Malone, Mike, the fighter's hardboiled, wisecracking manager, tries to keep them apart. Following a quarrel, Faith reconciles herself to marrying Siegfried. He invites a group of "weak sisters" to a revival meeting, and is disgraced when one accuses him of her downfall. Finally, with Mike's advice, Jerry wins back Faith and they are united with the family's blessings.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.