Director:

Clarence Brown

Writer:

Hans Kraly

Cinematographers:

Dev Jennings, George Barnes

Editor:

Hal C. Kern

Production Designer:

William Cameron Menzies

Production Company:

Art Finance Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

Referring to the picture by its early working title, The Untamed, the 27 May 1925 Var announced the picture as Rudolph Valentino’s first starring vehicle for United Artists Corp. Principal photography was set to begin on 8 Jun 1925 at the United Studios in Hollywood, CA. Actors Wallace Beery and Tully Marshall were listed as supporting cast members, however, credits in contemporary reviews do not confirm that either appeared in the film.
       The 18 Jul 1925 Moving Picture World stated that production was underway, and reported a title change to The Black Eagle. Two days later, the 20 Jul 1925 Var announced a third retitling to The Lone Eagle, and noted a $400,000 budget. United Artists had scheduled a 27 Sep 1925 release date, which required the picture to be completed and edited within six weeks. However, the eventual release was delayed until 8 Nov 1925. The title change was deemed necessary due to another United Artist feature with the same name, according to the 1 Aug 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review.
       The 12 Aug 1925 Var and the 29 Aug 1925 Motion Picture News listed actress Barbara Tennant amongst the cast.
       On 26 Aug 1925, Var reported that production was nearing completion, and the 13 Sep 1925 FD announced that the picture was currently being edited and titled.
       According to the 16 Sep 1925 Var, which referred to the picture by its release title, The Eagle, Rudolph Valentino was trampled and kicked in the face by a runaway horse during production, and sustained ... More Less

Referring to the picture by its early working title, The Untamed, the 27 May 1925 Var announced the picture as Rudolph Valentino’s first starring vehicle for United Artists Corp. Principal photography was set to begin on 8 Jun 1925 at the United Studios in Hollywood, CA. Actors Wallace Beery and Tully Marshall were listed as supporting cast members, however, credits in contemporary reviews do not confirm that either appeared in the film.
       The 18 Jul 1925 Moving Picture World stated that production was underway, and reported a title change to The Black Eagle. Two days later, the 20 Jul 1925 Var announced a third retitling to The Lone Eagle, and noted a $400,000 budget. United Artists had scheduled a 27 Sep 1925 release date, which required the picture to be completed and edited within six weeks. However, the eventual release was delayed until 8 Nov 1925. The title change was deemed necessary due to another United Artist feature with the same name, according to the 1 Aug 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review.
       The 12 Aug 1925 Var and the 29 Aug 1925 Motion Picture News listed actress Barbara Tennant amongst the cast.
       On 26 Aug 1925, Var reported that production was nearing completion, and the 13 Sep 1925 FD announced that the picture was currently being edited and titled.
       According to the 16 Sep 1925 Var, which referred to the picture by its release title, The Eagle, Rudolph Valentino was trampled and kicked in the face by a runaway horse during production, and sustained injuries to his ankle and wrist. However, no delays resulted, and filming resumed the next day. The Oct 1925 Picture-Play stated that the comedy gave Valentino the rare “opportunity to be unexpectedly humorous,” and he reportedly employed three unnamed writers to get “just the right story.” Hans Kraly, longtime scenarist for Ernst Lubitsch, received credit for writing the final draft. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Aug 1925
p. 45.
Exhibitors Trade Review
15 Aug 1925
p. 34.
Exhibitors Trade Review
14 Nov 1925
p. 33.
Film Daily
26 Jul 1925
p. 2.
Film Daily
13 Sep 1925
p. 11.
Film Daily
22 Nov 1925
p. 7.
Motion Picture News
29 Aug 1925
p. 1030.
Moving Picture World
18 Jul 1925
p. 308.
Moving Picture World
21 Nov 1925
p. 60.
New York Times
9 Nov 1925
p. 25.
Photoplay
Jan 1926
p. 46.
Picture-Play Magazine
Oct 1925
p. 73.
Variety
27 May 1925
p. 31.
Variety
20 Jul 1925
p. 38.
Variety
12 Aug 1925
p. 29.
Variety
26 Aug 1925
p. 12.
Variety
16 Sep 1925
p. 14.
Variety
11 Nov 1925
pp. 38-39.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the unfinished Russian novel Dubrovsky by Alexander Pushkin (written circa 1832-1833), as translated by T. Keane in Prose Tales of Alexander Pushkin (London, 1894).
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Lone Eagle
The Untamed
The Black Eagle
Release Date:
8 November 1925
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 8 November 1925
Copyright Claimant:
John W. Considine, Jr.
Copyright Date:
16 November 1925
Copyright Number:
LP22011
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,755
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Vladimir Dubrovsky, a young and inexperienced Cossack lieutenant, spurns the amorous advances of the czarina, Katherine II, and flees to his barracks. There he finds a letter from his father asking him to plead with the czarina to intercede on his behalf lest a neighbor, Kyrilla Troekouroff, seize his estate and castle. Returning to the imperial castle, he discovers that there is a price on his head. Dubrovsky returns home to find his father dying in a peasant's hut; he swears vengeance against Kyrilla and becomes The Eagle--leader of a bandit gang which befriends the poor and oppressed. He enters Kyrilla's home in the guise of his daughter's French tutor. Dubrovsky falls in love with the daughter (Mascha), and drops his plans for revenge. He is arrested by the czarina's troops and sentenced to be executed. Mascha marries him in prison, but the czarina relents, stages a fake execution, and allows the newlyweds to leave the ... +


Vladimir Dubrovsky, a young and inexperienced Cossack lieutenant, spurns the amorous advances of the czarina, Katherine II, and flees to his barracks. There he finds a letter from his father asking him to plead with the czarina to intercede on his behalf lest a neighbor, Kyrilla Troekouroff, seize his estate and castle. Returning to the imperial castle, he discovers that there is a price on his head. Dubrovsky returns home to find his father dying in a peasant's hut; he swears vengeance against Kyrilla and becomes The Eagle--leader of a bandit gang which befriends the poor and oppressed. He enters Kyrilla's home in the guise of his daughter's French tutor. Dubrovsky falls in love with the daughter (Mascha), and drops his plans for revenge. He is arrested by the czarina's troops and sentenced to be executed. Mascha marries him in prison, but the czarina relents, stages a fake execution, and allows the newlyweds to leave the country. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.