The Cohens and Kellys in Hollywood (1932)

75 mins | Comedy | 28 March 1932

Writer:

Howard J. Green

Producer:

Carl Laemmle Jr.

Cinematographer:

Jerome Ash

Editor:

Harry W. Lieb

Production Designer:

John Hughes

Production Company:

Universal Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The plot synopsis for this unviewed film was based on the studio cutting continuity. Although the continuity included the song, "Where Are You?" the authors of the song have not been identified. Although the cutting continuity credits call Norman Foster's character "Melville," within the text he is called "Maurice." One scene was filmed on location at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub in the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, CA. Various renowned actors have cameos in this scene, including Genevieve Tobin, Paul Power, Boris Karloff, Vivien Dale, Anglo Stevenson, Sidney Fox, Tom Mix, Lew Ayres and Gloria Stuart. The shots of Stuart (1910--2010) may have marked her first appearance on the screen. For further information on the series, see The Cohens and Kellys in Africa above and consult the Series Index. ...

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The plot synopsis for this unviewed film was based on the studio cutting continuity. Although the continuity included the song, "Where Are You?" the authors of the song have not been identified. Although the cutting continuity credits call Norman Foster's character "Melville," within the text he is called "Maurice." One scene was filmed on location at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub in the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, CA. Various renowned actors have cameos in this scene, including Genevieve Tobin, Paul Power, Boris Karloff, Vivien Dale, Anglo Stevenson, Sidney Fox, Tom Mix, Lew Ayres and Gloria Stuart. The shots of Stuart (1910--2010) may have marked her first appearance on the screen. For further information on the series, see The Cohens and Kellys in Africa above and consult the Series Index.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
24 Apr 1932
p. 10
International Photographer
Mar 1933
p. 34
Motion Picture Herald
19 Mar 1932
p. 39, 42
New York Times
22 Apr 1932
p. 23
Variety
26 Apr 1932
p. 54
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 March 1932
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures Corp.
17 March 1932
LP2926
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

The Cohen and Kelly families have been the best of friends in the small town of Hillsboro for years. Moe and Sarah Cohen's son Melville, who is in love with Michael and Maggie Kelly's daughter Kitty, sends her picture to Continental Productions in Hollywood after they advertise for new actresses. Kitty wins a contract with the company, and her family moves to Hollywood, where they meet with success and buy a mansion. After receiving a postcard from the Kellys saying "wish you were here," the Cohens sell their theatre in Hillsboro and move to Hollywood, but are snubbed on arrival by the now snobbish Kellys. Kelly loses all his money on Kitty's next picture, which is a flop because Kitty's voice does not register well for the new sound films. Now the tables turn, and it is the Cohens who experience success, but relations are no longer friendly between the two families. Melville sells his songs to motion pictures until songs are no longer a fad in films, and the Cohens once again go broke. Chesterfield, who was a butler for both families at different times, opens an elocution school and now it is his turn for wealth. The Cohens buy back their old jalopy and return to Hillsboro. On the way, they rescue the Kellys, whose car broke down, and upon renewing their friendship, they return to the happy life in Hillsboro they once ...

More Less

The Cohen and Kelly families have been the best of friends in the small town of Hillsboro for years. Moe and Sarah Cohen's son Melville, who is in love with Michael and Maggie Kelly's daughter Kitty, sends her picture to Continental Productions in Hollywood after they advertise for new actresses. Kitty wins a contract with the company, and her family moves to Hollywood, where they meet with success and buy a mansion. After receiving a postcard from the Kellys saying "wish you were here," the Cohens sell their theatre in Hillsboro and move to Hollywood, but are snubbed on arrival by the now snobbish Kellys. Kelly loses all his money on Kitty's next picture, which is a flop because Kitty's voice does not register well for the new sound films. Now the tables turn, and it is the Cohens who experience success, but relations are no longer friendly between the two families. Melville sells his songs to motion pictures until songs are no longer a fad in films, and the Cohens once again go broke. Chesterfield, who was a butler for both families at different times, opens an elocution school and now it is his turn for wealth. The Cohens buy back their old jalopy and return to Hillsboro. On the way, they rescue the Kellys, whose car broke down, and upon renewing their friendship, they return to the happy life in Hillsboro they once knew.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.