Charlie Chan at Monte Carlo (1938)

71 mins | Drama | 21 January 1938

Director:

Eugene Forde

Cinematographer:

Daniel B. Clark

Editor:

Nick DeMaggio

Production Designer:

Bernard Herzbrun

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

This was Warner Oland's last film. Oland began Charlie Chan at the Ringside in Jan 1938, but production was halted due to a dispute between Oland and the studio, according to news items. That film was subsequently produced in the "Mr. Moto" series as Mr. Moto's Gamble (see below). Oland died 6 Aug 1938 in Stockholm as he was preparing to sail to the U.S. to work on a new "Charlie Chan" film, after having been in ill since the Spring. This film was his sixteenth role as "Charlie Chan." For information concerning other films in the series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry below for Charlie Chan Carries On ... More Less

This was Warner Oland's last film. Oland began Charlie Chan at the Ringside in Jan 1938, but production was halted due to a dispute between Oland and the studio, according to news items. That film was subsequently produced in the "Mr. Moto" series as Mr. Moto's Gamble (see below). Oland died 6 Aug 1938 in Stockholm as he was preparing to sail to the U.S. to work on a new "Charlie Chan" film, after having been in ill since the Spring. This film was his sixteenth role as "Charlie Chan." For information concerning other films in the series, please consult the Series Index and see the entry below for Charlie Chan Carries On . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
13 Nov 1937.
---
Daily Variety
1 Nov 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
5 Nov 37
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 37
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Oct 37
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Nov 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
20 Oct 37
p. 43.
Motion Picture Herald
6 Nov 37
p. 33.
New York Times
18 Dec 37
p. 18.
Variety
22 Dec 37
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the character "Charlie Chan" created by Earl Derr Biggers.
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
21 January 1938
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 17 December 1937
Production Date:
20 September--mid October 1937
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
21 January 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8366
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71
Length(in feet):
6,465
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3797
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Charlie Chan and his son Lee attempt to leave Monte Carlo, where Chan is a shareholder in a casino, to go to Paris, where a painting by Lee will be exhibited, but on the road to the Nice airport, their taxi breaks down. Chan and Lee continue on foot until they see an expensive roadster leave another car and find a dead man in the other car. Upon investigating, they learn that the dead man was Renault, a bank messenger on his way to Paris with $1,000,000 in metallurgical bonds, now missing, which belonged to Victor Karnoff, who is staying at the Hotel Imperial. They also discover that three metallurical bonds were that day offered for sale at a Monte Carlo bank by Al Rogers, a bartender at the hotel. Chan recognizes the roadster in front of the hotel and learns that it belongs to Evelyn Grey, who is a resident there. Police inspector Joubert and Chan find her with Paul Savarin, a stock broker and Karnoff's bitter rival. Although she admits stopping by the car, Evelyn says that she fled in fright when she saw Chan and Lee approach. Joubert learns from a messenger that Karnoff's chauffeur Ludwig, who drove Renault and was in league with Savarin, was found dead. Later that day, Karnoff's wife Joan, who earlier begged Rogers to give her back the three bonds, admits to him that she stole them from his room, and he gives her until noon the next day to repay him. The next morning, Evelyn promises Gordon Chase, Karnoff's secretary, that she will not see Savarin again. After Chan learns that Evelyn has been ... +


Charlie Chan and his son Lee attempt to leave Monte Carlo, where Chan is a shareholder in a casino, to go to Paris, where a painting by Lee will be exhibited, but on the road to the Nice airport, their taxi breaks down. Chan and Lee continue on foot until they see an expensive roadster leave another car and find a dead man in the other car. Upon investigating, they learn that the dead man was Renault, a bank messenger on his way to Paris with $1,000,000 in metallurgical bonds, now missing, which belonged to Victor Karnoff, who is staying at the Hotel Imperial. They also discover that three metallurical bonds were that day offered for sale at a Monte Carlo bank by Al Rogers, a bartender at the hotel. Chan recognizes the roadster in front of the hotel and learns that it belongs to Evelyn Grey, who is a resident there. Police inspector Joubert and Chan find her with Paul Savarin, a stock broker and Karnoff's bitter rival. Although she admits stopping by the car, Evelyn says that she fled in fright when she saw Chan and Lee approach. Joubert learns from a messenger that Karnoff's chauffeur Ludwig, who drove Renault and was in league with Savarin, was found dead. Later that day, Karnoff's wife Joan, who earlier begged Rogers to give her back the three bonds, admits to him that she stole them from his room, and he gives her until noon the next day to repay him. The next morning, Evelyn promises Gordon Chase, Karnoff's secretary, that she will not see Savarin again. After Chan learns that Evelyn has been living in luxury with no visible means of income and that Joan pawned jewelry that morning for $25,000, the price of the three bonds, he and Joubert go to interrogate Rogers, but find him dead in his room with an open valise full of Karnoff's bonds. Joubert believes that Rogers committed suicide and that the case is closed, but Chan suggests they go to Karnoff's suite, where they also find Joan, Savarin, Gordon and Evelyn. Joan confesses that Rogers, whom she married seven years earlier and whom she thought had obtained a divorce, was blackmailing her. She had given him the three bonds, but stole them back when she learned of her husband's deal, and had her brother, Gordon, replace them in Karnoff's safe. Chan surmises that Gordon must be the murderer because only he had a key to the valise, and that the valise was found open in Rogers' room, with no damage to its lock. Gordon confesses and berates Evelyn, for whom he says he stole from Karnoff months ago. When he was in danger of being exposed, he murdered Rogers to place the blame on him. Gordon then escapes through a window, but he is run over by a car. Joubert insists that Evelyn and Savarin leave Monte Carlo and gives his friends, Chan and Lee, another send-off in the same, backfiring taxi. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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