Enticement (1925)

Melodrama | 1 February 1925

Director:

George Archainbaud

Writer:

Bradley King

Cinematographer:

Henry Sharp

Production Company:

Thomas H. Ince Corp.
Full page view
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Feb 1925
p. 37
Film Daily
1 Feb 1925
---
New York Times
21 Mar 1925
p. 16
Variety
25 Mar 1925
p. 37
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 February 1925
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Thomas H. Ince Corp.
19 January 1925
LP21037
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,407
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Leonore Bewlay meets her old friend Richard Valyran in Switzerland 2 years after the Great War, during which they did relief work together in Belgium. Previously their friendship was platonic, but Richard now finds Leonore sexually attractive. On their way to an inn high in the Alps, they are caught in a snowslide and Leonore's leg is injured. Val carries her to the inn, helps remove her clothes, and, overcome with lust, kisses her madly. This display of passion effectively destroys their friendship. Leonore soon marries Henry Wallis, whom she truly loves, and returns with him to his home in London where she is unpopular with his conservative family, who consider her too outspoken and independent. When Leonore is named as the corespondent in a divorce suit filed by Richard's estranged wife, Henry loses faith in her. When she goes to Richard for consolation, he perceives that she still loves Henry and deliberately walks in front of an oncoming car. As he lies dying in a hospital, Richard has the final satisfaction of seeing Henry and Leonore reconciled, to be saved from the consequences of scandal by his imminent ...

More Less

Leonore Bewlay meets her old friend Richard Valyran in Switzerland 2 years after the Great War, during which they did relief work together in Belgium. Previously their friendship was platonic, but Richard now finds Leonore sexually attractive. On their way to an inn high in the Alps, they are caught in a snowslide and Leonore's leg is injured. Val carries her to the inn, helps remove her clothes, and, overcome with lust, kisses her madly. This display of passion effectively destroys their friendship. Leonore soon marries Henry Wallis, whom she truly loves, and returns with him to his home in London where she is unpopular with his conservative family, who consider her too outspoken and independent. When Leonore is named as the corespondent in a divorce suit filed by Richard's estranged wife, Henry loses faith in her. When she goes to Richard for consolation, he perceives that she still loves Henry and deliberately walks in front of an oncoming car. As he lies dying in a hospital, Richard has the final satisfaction of seeing Henry and Leonore reconciled, to be saved from the consequences of scandal by his imminent death.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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