City Streets (1938)

62 or 68 mins | Drama | 1 July 1938

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HISTORY

Working titles for this film were City Shadows and No Greater Love . Copyright records erroneously list assistant director William Mull as William Moe. Author Isadore Bernstein's original story was first filmed by Columbia in 1932 as No Greater Love (see ... More Less

Working titles for this film were City Shadows and No Greater Love . Copyright records erroneously list assistant director William Mull as William Moe. Author Isadore Bernstein's original story was first filmed by Columbia in 1932 as No Greater Love (see below). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
17 Jun 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
29 Jul 38
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Apr 38
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jun 38
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jun 38
p. 9.
New York Times
25 Jul 38
p. 18.
Variety
27 Jul 38
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
Sd eng
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
No Greater Love
City Shadows
Release Date:
1 July 1938
Production Date:
7 April--27 April 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp. of California, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
27 June 1938
Copyright Number:
LP8107
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62 or 68
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4268
SYNOPSIS

Little Tommy Francis Devlin accidentally hits a baseball through the shop window of "Uncle" Joe Carmine, a well-loved shopkeeper in a lower-class New York City neighborhood. When the mother of neighborhood girl Winnie Brady dies, Joe convinces Father Ryan to let him informally adopt her. Joe and Winnie live together with Tommy and his grandmother, Mrs. Devlin, and a dog Winnie names Muriel. Winnie is confined to a wheelchair, so Joe takes her to Dr. Thompson, who says that only Dr. Ferenc Waller, a recent European emigre, can help her. Waller, however, will operate only for a $3,000 fee, so Joe sells his store to make the surgery possible. Dr. Waller only effects a small change in her condition, and Winnie is not able to stand for more than a few moments. Meanwhile, Joe is trying to sell fruit on a street corner, and one night during a storm, he leaves to buy Winnie a birthday cake. During his absence, a community welfare investigator takes Winnie and places her in an orphanage. Joe becomes a popular visitor at the orphanage, but the superintendent tells him it is in Winnie's best interest that he end his visits, so that she can be adopted by another family. Hoping Winnie will be taken in by a family that can afford proper treatment, Joe tells her he has tired of her, but is so haunted by her cries that he collapses in the street. Joe's illness can be overcome only if he regains his will to live, so Father Ryan takes Winnie from the orphanage by force. She is so afraid that Joe might ... +


Little Tommy Francis Devlin accidentally hits a baseball through the shop window of "Uncle" Joe Carmine, a well-loved shopkeeper in a lower-class New York City neighborhood. When the mother of neighborhood girl Winnie Brady dies, Joe convinces Father Ryan to let him informally adopt her. Joe and Winnie live together with Tommy and his grandmother, Mrs. Devlin, and a dog Winnie names Muriel. Winnie is confined to a wheelchair, so Joe takes her to Dr. Thompson, who says that only Dr. Ferenc Waller, a recent European emigre, can help her. Waller, however, will operate only for a $3,000 fee, so Joe sells his store to make the surgery possible. Dr. Waller only effects a small change in her condition, and Winnie is not able to stand for more than a few moments. Meanwhile, Joe is trying to sell fruit on a street corner, and one night during a storm, he leaves to buy Winnie a birthday cake. During his absence, a community welfare investigator takes Winnie and places her in an orphanage. Joe becomes a popular visitor at the orphanage, but the superintendent tells him it is in Winnie's best interest that he end his visits, so that she can be adopted by another family. Hoping Winnie will be taken in by a family that can afford proper treatment, Joe tells her he has tired of her, but is so haunted by her cries that he collapses in the street. Joe's illness can be overcome only if he regains his will to live, so Father Ryan takes Winnie from the orphanage by force. She is so afraid that Joe might die that she walks across the room to his bedside and sings his favorite song, "Santa Maria." Later, after Winnie has acquired full use of her legs, Joe buys a catering truck and takes the children on a picnic. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.