I'll Be Seeing You (1945)

83 mins | Drama | 5 January 1945

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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were With All My Heart and Double Furlough . A contemporary source indicates that the radio play Double Furlough starred James Cagney and Gertrude Lawrence, but information about its broadcast has not been located. HR news items provide the following information about the production: In Jan 1944, John Cromwell was slated to direct the film. In late Feb, a news item announced that Joan Fontaine, who was to play the female lead, was forced to withdraw due to previous commitments. Although a HR production chart places Ralph Morgan, Stanley Ridges, Ruth Brennan and Wilfred Jillson in the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. In Apr 1944, other HR news items added Stewart Garner and George Turner to the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Locations shots were filmed at Big Bear Lake, the RKO Ranch and at Chatsworth, CA, including the Iverson Ranch, according to other HR news items. Modern sources add Walter Baldwin to the cast.
       This was the first production of David O. Selznick's Vanguard Films. In a memo from Selznick reprinted in a modern source, the producer noted that he had hired Dore Schary to oversee Vanguard, and supported him in his decision to buy this story. According to the memo, Schary took umbrage at some of Selznick's criticisms of the script and later balked at Selznick's insistence that he re-edit the picture. In his autobiography, Schary claimed that Selznick originally forbid him to cast Joseph Cotten as the male lead, but ...

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The working titles of this film were With All My Heart and Double Furlough . A contemporary source indicates that the radio play Double Furlough starred James Cagney and Gertrude Lawrence, but information about its broadcast has not been located. HR news items provide the following information about the production: In Jan 1944, John Cromwell was slated to direct the film. In late Feb, a news item announced that Joan Fontaine, who was to play the female lead, was forced to withdraw due to previous commitments. Although a HR production chart places Ralph Morgan, Stanley Ridges, Ruth Brennan and Wilfred Jillson in the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. In Apr 1944, other HR news items added Stewart Garner and George Turner to the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Locations shots were filmed at Big Bear Lake, the RKO Ranch and at Chatsworth, CA, including the Iverson Ranch, according to other HR news items. Modern sources add Walter Baldwin to the cast.
       This was the first production of David O. Selznick's Vanguard Films. In a memo from Selznick reprinted in a modern source, the producer noted that he had hired Dore Schary to oversee Vanguard, and supported him in his decision to buy this story. According to the memo, Schary took umbrage at some of Selznick's criticisms of the script and later balked at Selznick's insistence that he re-edit the picture. In his autobiography, Schary claimed that Selznick originally forbid him to cast Joseph Cotten as the male lead, but later relented. Schary added that Selznick wanted to use Noel Coward's "I'll See You Again" as the film's tile, but was unable to obtain the rights and so used "I'll Be Seeing You" instead. Another modern source noted that Selznick was displeased with William Dieterle's direction of the scene in which "Barbara" confesses to "Mary" that she told "Zach" about her prison record. According to that source, Selznick wrote a replacement scene and hired George Cukor to direct it. On 24 Dec 1945, Lux Radio Theater broadcast a radio version of this story starring Joseph Cotten. I'll Be Seeing You marked the first time that actor John Derek (1926--1998), who was billed as "Dare Harris," received an onscreen credit. Derek had previously appeared in a bit role in Selznick's Since You Went Away .

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Dec 1944.
---
Daily Variety
19 Dec 44
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Dec 44
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jan 44
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 44
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 44
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 44
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Apr 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Apr 44
p. 5, 6
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 44
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 44
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 May 44
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Dec 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Apr 45
p. 12.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 May 44
p. 1913.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
23 Dec 44
pp. 2237-38.
New York Times
6 Apr 45
p. 20.
Variety
20 Dec 44
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
2d cam
2d cam
ART DIRECTORS
Settings
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Int dec
Int dec
COSTUMES
Miss Rogers' costs
MUSIC
SOUND
Re-rec and eff mixer
Mus mixer
Mus mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Transparency projection shots
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Research dir
Unit mgr
Consultant on neuropsychiatry
Supv railroad seq
Adv YMCA party seq
Prod asst
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the radio play Double Furlough by Charles Martin (broadcast date undetermined).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"I'll Be Seeing You," words and music by Sammy Fain and Irving Kahal.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Double Furlough
With All My Heart
Release Date:
5 January 1945
Production Date:
late Mar--29 May 1944
Copyright Info
Claimant
DATE
CopyrightNumber
Vanguard Films, Inc.
23 December 1944
LP13338
Vanguard Films, Inc.
5 January 1945
LP13192
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
83
Length(in feet):
7,740
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
10275
SYNOPSIS

Social outcasts Mary Marshall and Sgt. Zachary Morgan meet while seated across from each other on a train bound for Pine Hill. Zach, a victim of shell shock and therefore a prisoner of his own mind, has just been granted a ten-day leave from a military hospital to try to readjust to daily life, while Mary has just been given a special eight-day furlough from prison so that she can spend the Christmas holiday with her aunt and uncle in Pine Hill. Each harbors his own secret, and consequently, Mary lies to Zach that she is a traveling saleslady on her way to spend the holidays with her family, while Zach tells Mary that he is going to visit his sister in Pine Hill. After the train pulls into the station, the two exchange names and Mary then goes to the Marshall home, where she is reunited with her uncle Henry, aunt Clara and cousin Barbara. Zach, meanwhile, checks into the YMCA. Unsure of herself after a three-year confinement in prison, Mary laments the loss of her youthful dreams of having a husband and family. Soon after, Zach phones and Mary invites him to dinner. After the meal, Zach tells Mary that he has no sister, but stopped in Pine Hill to be near her. He and Mary then attend a war movie, but Zach falls mute when Mary questions him about his own experiences in the war. While stopping at a café afterward, Zach panics when the soda jerk, who is afflicted with a facial tick, recounts being shell-shocked during World War I. Apprehensive that his affliction will also result ...

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Social outcasts Mary Marshall and Sgt. Zachary Morgan meet while seated across from each other on a train bound for Pine Hill. Zach, a victim of shell shock and therefore a prisoner of his own mind, has just been granted a ten-day leave from a military hospital to try to readjust to daily life, while Mary has just been given a special eight-day furlough from prison so that she can spend the Christmas holiday with her aunt and uncle in Pine Hill. Each harbors his own secret, and consequently, Mary lies to Zach that she is a traveling saleslady on her way to spend the holidays with her family, while Zach tells Mary that he is going to visit his sister in Pine Hill. After the train pulls into the station, the two exchange names and Mary then goes to the Marshall home, where she is reunited with her uncle Henry, aunt Clara and cousin Barbara. Zach, meanwhile, checks into the YMCA. Unsure of herself after a three-year confinement in prison, Mary laments the loss of her youthful dreams of having a husband and family. Soon after, Zach phones and Mary invites him to dinner. After the meal, Zach tells Mary that he has no sister, but stopped in Pine Hill to be near her. He and Mary then attend a war movie, but Zach falls mute when Mary questions him about his own experiences in the war. While stopping at a café afterward, Zach panics when the soda jerk, who is afflicted with a facial tick, recounts being shell-shocked during World War I. Apprehensive that his affliction will also result in disfigurement, Zach flees the café but is unable to share his fears with Mary. Upon returning home, Mary, who is sharing Barbara's room, finds that Barbara has labeled her possessions. Realizing that Barbara distrusts her, Mary relates the circumstances that sent her to prison: After the death of her parents, Mary goes to work as a secretary. One night, her wealthy boss invites her to dinner at his apartment and Mary naïvely accepts, believing that he is inviting her to a party. Shocked to discover that she is the only guest, Mary is accosted by her drunken boss. While struggling to avoid his advances, Mary pushes him away, sending him to his death through an open window. After being convicted of manslaughter, Mary is sentenced to six years in prison. At the end of Mary's story, Barbara, who is touched by her cousin's misfortune, begs her forgiveness. The next day, Zach invites Mary to the lake and there explains his behavior of the previous night. After voicing his fears of becoming like the soda jerk, Zach asks Mary to help him believe in himself as she believes in herself. Over Christmas dinner at the Marshall house, Zach rhapsodizes about feeling at home with the family. Aware that her stay with the family is temporary, Mary becomes despondent and asks Sarah if she should tell Zach the truth. Sarah counsels her to remain silent. When Zach invites the Marshall family to a New Year's Eve party at the YMCA, Sarah buys Mary a new dress for the occasion. At the party, a senator solicits Zach's opinion as a soldier on political issues, and Zach outspokenly replies that each soldier is an individual and as such holds different opinions. While walking home with Mary after the dance, Zach is attacked by a dog and fends off the animal until its owner arrives to restrain it. As Mary bids Zach goodnight, she comments that he has regained his confidence and is now recovered. Knowing that they are both scheduled to leave the next day, Zach tries to discuss their future together, but Mary feigns sleepiness and asks to delay the discussion. Entering the house in tears, Mary confides her love for Zach to Sarah. Meanwhile, after jubilantly returning to his hotel room, Zach suffers a relapse but is restored by recalling the sound of Mary's voice. The next day, Zach comes to the Marshall house to say goodbye. While alone with Zach, Barbara inadvertently blurts out the details of Mary's prison sentence. Mary senses that something is wrong when Zach suddenly becomes distant and silently boards the train. Upon returning home, Mary discovers that Barbara has divulged her secret and bursts into tears. That night, as Mary approaches the gates of the state prison, Zach steps from the shadows to embrace her and declare his love.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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