Fox Movietone Follies of 1929 (1929)

80 mins | Musical comedy | 25 May 1929

Director:

David Butler

Writer:

David Butler

Cinematographer:

Charles Van Enger

Editor:

Ralph Dietrich

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The film was copyrighted under the title William Fox Movietone Follies of 1929. Some reviews, including the review in Var, listed the title as Fox Movietone Follies (of 1929). The studio made another, similar film the following year entitled Fox Movietone Follies of 1930 (See Entry). ...

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The film was copyrighted under the title William Fox Movietone Follies of 1929. Some reviews, including the review in Var, listed the title as Fox Movietone Follies (of 1929). The studio made another, similar film the following year entitled Fox Movietone Follies of 1930 (See Entry).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
26 May 1929
---
Variety
29 May 1929
p. 14
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Revue dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus cond
SOUND
Joseph E. Aiken
Rec eng
DANCE
Ensembles
Fanchon & Marco
Ensembles
SOURCES
SONGS
"Walking With Susie," "Why Can't I Be Like You?" "Legs," "Breakaway," "That's You Baby," "Look What You've Done to Me," "Big City Blues" and "Pearl of Old Japan," words and music by Con Conrad, Sidney Mitchell and Archie Gottler.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
William Fox Movietone Follies of 1929
Release Date:
25 May 1929
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Fox Film Corp.
8 May 1929
LP402
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black & white with color sequences
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
80
Length(in feet):
8,291
Length(in reels):
14
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

George Shelby, a southern boy, comes to the city to dissuade Lila, his sweetheart, from embarking on a stage career and finally buys out the controlling interest in the revue so that he can fire her. On the opening night, however, she goes onstage when the prima donna of the show becomes tempermental, and she proves to be a big hit. At this development, George is able to sell the show back to the producer, who had previously lacked confidence in his investment and planned to take advantage of the youth's ...

More Less

George Shelby, a southern boy, comes to the city to dissuade Lila, his sweetheart, from embarking on a stage career and finally buys out the controlling interest in the revue so that he can fire her. On the opening night, however, she goes onstage when the prima donna of the show becomes tempermental, and she proves to be a big hit. At this development, George is able to sell the show back to the producer, who had previously lacked confidence in his investment and planned to take advantage of the youth's inexperience.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.