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HISTORY

The 12 Jan 1923 FD announced a partnership between theatrical impresario David Belasco and Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc., to film several of Belasco’s most successful productions, the first of which was The Gold Diggers by Avery Hopwood. More than three months later, the 21 Apr 1923 Motion Picture News reported that Belasco approved the adaptation by scenarist Grant Carpenter. Studio executives Sam and Jack Warner were in the process of selecting the cast. On 30 Jun 1923, Motion Picture News reported the start of principal photography during the previous week. The 8 Jul 1923 FD and 4 Aug 1923 Motion Picture News noted that the film marked screen debut of vaudeville entertainer Frances Ross, in the role of “Dolly Baxter,” although other sources identify her character as “Gypsy Montrose.”
       The 15 Jul 1923 FD revealed that director Harry Beaumont closed the set to spectators after two days of interruptions by reporters seeking interviews with star Hope Hampton. The end of principal photography was announced in the Aug 1923 AmCin.
       A preview screening was held at a private party hosted by studio president Harry Warner for David Belasco, in Sheepshead Bay, NY, as reported in the 23 Aug 1923 FD. The film opened at the Rialto theater in New York City the week of 9 Sep 1923. Reviews were generally positive.
       For information on other adaptations of Avery Hopwood's play, please consult the entry below for the 1933 Warner Bros. film Gold Diggers of 1933 , directed by Mervyn LeRoy and starring ... More Less

The 12 Jan 1923 FD announced a partnership between theatrical impresario David Belasco and Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc., to film several of Belasco’s most successful productions, the first of which was The Gold Diggers by Avery Hopwood. More than three months later, the 21 Apr 1923 Motion Picture News reported that Belasco approved the adaptation by scenarist Grant Carpenter. Studio executives Sam and Jack Warner were in the process of selecting the cast. On 30 Jun 1923, Motion Picture News reported the start of principal photography during the previous week. The 8 Jul 1923 FD and 4 Aug 1923 Motion Picture News noted that the film marked screen debut of vaudeville entertainer Frances Ross, in the role of “Dolly Baxter,” although other sources identify her character as “Gypsy Montrose.”
       The 15 Jul 1923 FD revealed that director Harry Beaumont closed the set to spectators after two days of interruptions by reporters seeking interviews with star Hope Hampton. The end of principal photography was announced in the Aug 1923 AmCin.
       A preview screening was held at a private party hosted by studio president Harry Warner for David Belasco, in Sheepshead Bay, NY, as reported in the 23 Aug 1923 FD. The film opened at the Rialto theater in New York City the week of 9 Sep 1923. Reviews were generally positive.
       For information on other adaptations of Avery Hopwood's play, please consult the entry below for the 1933 Warner Bros. film Gold Diggers of 1933 , directed by Mervyn LeRoy and starring Warren William and Joan Blondell. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Aug 1923
p. 26.
Film Daily
12 Jan 1923
p. 1.
Film Daily
8 Jul 1923
p. 8.
Film Daily
15 Jul 1923
p. 10.
Film Daily
23 Aug 1923
p. 2.
Film Daily
10 Sep 1923
p. 4.
Film Daily
13 Sep 1923
p. 1.
Motion Picture News
27 Jan 1923
p. 436.
Motion Picture News
21 Apr 1923
p. 1967.
Motion Picture News
30 Jun 1923
p. 3193.
Motion Picture News
4 Aug 1923
p. 530.
Motion Picture News
15 Sep 1923
p. 1306.
Motion Picture News
22 Sep 1923.
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DETAILS
Release Date:
22 September 1923
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 9 September 1923
Production Date:
late June--late July 1923
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers
Copyright Date:
4 September 1923
Copyright Number:
LP19370
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,600
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Stephen Lee objects to the marriage of his nephew, Wally Saunders, to dancer Violet Dayne because he feels that all chorus girls are gold diggers. Violet's friend, Jerry La Mar, who is not a gold digger, decides to vamp Lee so that he will see by comparison what an unselfish girl Violet is. Lee becomes fascinated with Jerry, and although he knows the truth, he marries her, approving at the same time his nephew's ... +


Stephen Lee objects to the marriage of his nephew, Wally Saunders, to dancer Violet Dayne because he feels that all chorus girls are gold diggers. Violet's friend, Jerry La Mar, who is not a gold digger, decides to vamp Lee so that he will see by comparison what an unselfish girl Violet is. Lee becomes fascinated with Jerry, and although he knows the truth, he marries her, approving at the same time his nephew's choice. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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Uncles, Gold diggers, Chorus girls
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.