Boots and Saddles (1937)

58 mins | Western | 4 October 1937

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HISTORY

The film's titles credit Aaron Gonzalez, Jr. as an additional song writer, but his contribution to the released film has not been determined. Modern sources add the following actors to the cast: Max Terhune, Jerry Frank, Bob Reeves, Nelson McDowell and Al ... More Less

The film's titles credit Aaron Gonzalez, Jr. as an additional song writer, but his contribution to the released film has not been determined. Modern sources add the following actors to the cast: Max Terhune, Jerry Frank, Bob Reeves, Nelson McDowell and Al Taylor. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Nov 37
p. 3.
Film Daily
26 Oct 37
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Aug 37
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Aug 37
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 37
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
18 Oct 37
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
13 Nov 37
p. 46.
New York Times
8 Nov 37
p. 19.
Variety
13 Oct 37
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Take Me Back to My Boots and Saddle," words and music by Walter G. Samuels, Leonard Whitcup and Teddy Powell
"Ridin' the Range," words and music by Gene Autry, Fleming Allan and Nelson Shawn
"The One Rose (That's Left in My Heart)," words and music by Lani McIntire and Del Lyon
+
SONGS
"Take Me Back to My Boots and Saddle," words and music by Walter G. Samuels, Leonard Whitcup and Teddy Powell
"Ridin' the Range," words and music by Gene Autry, Fleming Allan and Nelson Shawn
"The One Rose (That's Left in My Heart)," words and music by Lani McIntire and Del Lyon
"Dusty Roads," words and music by Smiley Burnette
"Oh, Why Did He Get Married?" words and music by Carson Robison
"Cielito lindo," traditional.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 October 1937
Production Date:
late July--early August 1937
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
4 October 1937
Copyright Number:
LP7557
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor High Fidelity Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
58
Length(in feet):
5,221
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3649
SYNOPSIS

After his father dies, Edward, the young Earl of Granville, travels from England with his solicitor, Henry Wyndham, to his father's ranch in the western United States. Edward is greeted by ranch foreman Gene Autry and Gene's pal, Frog Millhouse. Gene and Frog, who promised their late friend that they would make a real Westerner of his son, are dismayed by Edward's arrogant demeanor and Wyndham's assertion that the ranch, which is deeply in debt, will be sold at once. Gene rescues Edward from a runaway horse, and Edward's apology for his earlier attitude proves to Gene that he is a "regular fellow." Gene and Frog christen him "Spud," which was also his father's nickname, and encourage him to keep the ranch open. They are approached about buying the ranch by Jim Neale, a wealthy rancher to whom the late earl owed money. Neale inadvertently gives them the idea to save the ranch by selling their feisty cow ponies to the Army, but he warns them that if they do not pay him his money in sixty days he will sue. A few days later, Edward has proven his mettle by helping round up the horses, and the cowboys drive them back to the ranch. On the way to nearby Fort Wayne, where Gene intends to offer his horses for sale to Colonel Allen, Gene, Frog and the others insult the passengers of a buggy by deliberately overwhelming them with the dust raised by their wagons. Unknown to Gene, the passengers are Neale, Allen and his daughter Bernice. Bernice recognizes Gene when he comes to the colonel's quarters and pretends to be a maidservant in order to ridicule ... +


After his father dies, Edward, the young Earl of Granville, travels from England with his solicitor, Henry Wyndham, to his father's ranch in the western United States. Edward is greeted by ranch foreman Gene Autry and Gene's pal, Frog Millhouse. Gene and Frog, who promised their late friend that they would make a real Westerner of his son, are dismayed by Edward's arrogant demeanor and Wyndham's assertion that the ranch, which is deeply in debt, will be sold at once. Gene rescues Edward from a runaway horse, and Edward's apology for his earlier attitude proves to Gene that he is a "regular fellow." Gene and Frog christen him "Spud," which was also his father's nickname, and encourage him to keep the ranch open. They are approached about buying the ranch by Jim Neale, a wealthy rancher to whom the late earl owed money. Neale inadvertently gives them the idea to save the ranch by selling their feisty cow ponies to the Army, but he warns them that if they do not pay him his money in sixty days he will sue. A few days later, Edward has proven his mettle by helping round up the horses, and the cowboys drive them back to the ranch. On the way to nearby Fort Wayne, where Gene intends to offer his horses for sale to Colonel Allen, Gene, Frog and the others insult the passengers of a buggy by deliberately overwhelming them with the dust raised by their wagons. Unknown to Gene, the passengers are Neale, Allen and his daughter Bernice. Bernice recognizes Gene when he comes to the colonel's quarters and pretends to be a maidservant in order to ridicule him later. She falsely advises Gene that Allen is hard of hearing, and so the next day, Allen is put off by Gene's yelling at him during the horse auction. Allen refuses to consider Gene's cow horses until he sees Gene's own horse, the magnificent "Champion," in action. Gene and Neale's bids are the same, so Allen proposes that they each race twelve horses the next morning and that the winner will receive the contract. That night, Gene eludes Neale's henchmen, who have been ordered to get him out of the way, while Edward locks up a process server attempting to serve a summons claiming all their property for Neale. Gene then gets the upper hand on Bernice and reveals that he knows who she is. They are quarreling when Gene spots a fire in the barn where his horses are being kept. While the horses are being saved, Frog reveals that he does not know who knocked him out and started the blaze, but that he was able to grab hold of the man's watch and can use it to discover the arsonist's identity. The next morning, Gene determines to carry on even though he has only five horses left, and the race begins. Edward tells Bernice what a fine fellow Gene is for helping him, and Frog discovers that the watch belongs to Neale's henchman, Joe Larkins. Despite Neale's dirty tricks, Gene wins the race, and Edward's ranch is awarded the contract. Larkins reveals Neales's underhanded schemes, and Gene and Bernice make up. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.