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HISTORY

According to news items, the film's title was briefly changed to Overboard. Some sources reviewed the film as Headwinds. ...

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According to news items, the film's title was briefly changed to Overboard. Some sources reviewed the film as Headwinds.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Atlantic (IA) News-Telegram
25 mar 1925
p. 8
Exhibitors Trade Review
18 Apr 1925
p. 63
Film Daily
22 Mar 1925
---
Manitowoc (WI) Herald News
16 Mar 1925
p. 5
Oakland (CA) Tribune
8 Mar 1925
p. 78
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Universal-Jewel
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
Edward T. Lowe Jr.
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Head Winds by A. M. Sinclair Wilt (New York, 1923).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Headwinds
Overboard
Release Date:
29 March 1925
Premiere Information:
Manitowoc, WI opening: 17 Mar 1925
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures Corp.
9 March 1925
LP21242
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,486
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Peter Rosslyn, a sturdy gentleman yachtsman in love with irresponsible and vivacious Patricia Van Felt, does not propose to her in the hope that with time she will mature. When Peter learns, however, that she is planning to marry Templeton Arnold, a fortune hunter, he arranges for her to be brought aboard his yacht, where he impersonates Arnold by swathing his head in bandages. A minister is brought on board, and Patricia marries Peter, still thinking him to be Arnold. Peter sets sail, taking off his bandages in private. Patricia is stunned to see him, believing herself to have been kidnaped; she tries to escape in a rowboat but is brought back to the yacht by its Chinese crew. She becomes ill and learns from her nurse that she is really married to Peter. When she recovers, she and Peter are reconciled and begin married life in ...

More Less

Peter Rosslyn, a sturdy gentleman yachtsman in love with irresponsible and vivacious Patricia Van Felt, does not propose to her in the hope that with time she will mature. When Peter learns, however, that she is planning to marry Templeton Arnold, a fortune hunter, he arranges for her to be brought aboard his yacht, where he impersonates Arnold by swathing his head in bandages. A minister is brought on board, and Patricia marries Peter, still thinking him to be Arnold. Peter sets sail, taking off his bandages in private. Patricia is stunned to see him, believing herself to have been kidnaped; she tries to escape in a rowboat but is brought back to the yacht by its Chinese crew. She becomes ill and learns from her nurse that she is really married to Peter. When she recovers, she and Peter are reconciled and begin married life in earnest.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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