A Hero on Horseback (1927)

Western | 10 July 1927

Director:

Del Andrews

Cinematographer:

Harry Neumann

Production Designer:

David Garber

Production Company:

Universal Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The scenario was based on the short story, "Bread Upon the Waters" by Peter B. Kyne, first published in the September 1923 Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan. The title, A Hero on Horseback was announced in the 18 December 1926 Moving Picture World as an upcoming Universal Film Corp. production starring Hoot Gibson and directed by Lynn Reynolds, to be released on 10 July 1927. However, the source story was incorrectly identified as “Nine Points of the Law” by Ralph Boston. Weeks later, the 24 February 1927 Exhibitors Daily Review falsely claimed that the source was “The Cow Jerry” by George Ogden.
       Principal photography began at Universal Studios in Universal City, CA, in late March 1927, as indicated by news items in the 26 March 1927 Moving Picture World, the 30 March 1927 Variety, and the 3 April 1927 Film Daily. The working title was The Prairie King. Director Del Andrews had replaced Lynn Reynolds. Location shooting took place in Paso Robles, CA. While the 2 May 1927 Moving Picture World reported that the title had been changed to A Hero on Horseback, the 7 May 1927 Exhibitors Herald claimed that another Gibson film of the same name had been retitled The Prairie King (1927, see entry). It had previously been known as Nine Points of the Law. Production was completed that same month, according to a chart in the 21 May 1927 Exhibitors Herald. A photograph caption in the 11 June ...

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The scenario was based on the short story, "Bread Upon the Waters" by Peter B. Kyne, first published in the September 1923 Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan. The title, A Hero on Horseback was announced in the 18 December 1926 Moving Picture World as an upcoming Universal Film Corp. production starring Hoot Gibson and directed by Lynn Reynolds, to be released on 10 July 1927. However, the source story was incorrectly identified as “Nine Points of the Law” by Ralph Boston. Weeks later, the 24 February 1927 Exhibitors Daily Review falsely claimed that the source was “The Cow Jerry” by George Ogden.
       Principal photography began at Universal Studios in Universal City, CA, in late March 1927, as indicated by news items in the 26 March 1927 Moving Picture World, the 30 March 1927 Variety, and the 3 April 1927 Film Daily. The working title was The Prairie King. Director Del Andrews had replaced Lynn Reynolds. Location shooting took place in Paso Robles, CA. While the 2 May 1927 Moving Picture World reported that the title had been changed to A Hero on Horseback, the 7 May 1927 Exhibitors Herald claimed that another Gibson film of the same name had been retitled The Prairie King (1927, see entry). It had previously been known as Nine Points of the Law. Production was completed that same month, according to a chart in the 21 May 1927 Exhibitors Herald. A photograph caption in the 11 June 1927 issue misidentified Buck Jones as the star. The October 1927 Motion Picture News Booking Guide listed “Ed. Neumann” as the cinematographer; other sources have credited Harry Neumann.
       A Hero on Horseback was released on 10 July 1927, preceded by a 6 July 1927 showing at Loew’s New York Theatre in New York City.
       The 6 June 1925 Exhibitors Herald revealed that the title had been temporarily applied to another Hoot Gibson picture, which was made in 1925 and based on the novel, A Daughter of the Dons by William MacCleod Raine. It was later released as Burning the Wind (1928, see entry).
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, this film is extant.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Daily Review
24 Feb 1927
p. 11
Exhibitors Herald
6 Jun 1925
p. 85
Exhibitors Herald
23 Apr 1927
p. 42
Exhibitors Herald
7 May 1927
p. 66
Exhibitors Herald
21 May 1927
p. 50
Exhibitors Herald
11 Jun 1927
p. 38
Film Daily
3 Apr 1927
p. 8
Film Daily
5 Jul 1927
p. 2
Film Daily
24 Jul 1927
p. 8
Motion Picture News
3 Jul 1926
p. 33
Movie Age
27 Aug 1927
p. 22
Moving Picture World
18 Dec 1926
p. 504
Moving Picture World
26 Mar 1927
p. 276
Moving Picture World
2 May 1927
p. 796
MPN Booking Guide
Oct 1927
p. 29, 146
Reading Eagle [Reading, PA]
23 Mar 1928
p. 30
Universal Weekly
21 Feb 1925
p. 12
Universal Weekly
30 May 1925
p. 4
Variety
30 Mar 1927
p. 23
Variety
13 Jul 1927
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Universal-Jewel
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
David S. Garber
Art dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story, "Bread Upon the Waters" by Peter B. Kyne in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (Sep 1923).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Prairie King
Release Date:
10 July 1927
Premiere Information:
New York showing: 6 Jul 1927
Production Date:
Mar--Apr 1927
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures Corp.
30 June 1927
LP24135
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,551
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Billy Garford, a happy-go-lucky cowboy, gambles away most of the $500 lent him by rancher J. D. Starbuck, then invests his last fifty dollars with aging prospector Jimmie Breeze. The cowboy finds work on the Starbuck ranch but is soon fired for paying too much attention to the boss’s daughter, Ollie. After Jimmie strikes gold, he and Billy take over a local bank. Ollie is hired as Billy’s secretary, much to the displeasure of Harvey Grey, a cashier who considers her to be his fiancée. Harvey takes revenge by robbing the bank, but Jimmie is the prime suspect because of his many debts. While Billy pursues Harvey, Ollie has inadvertently been locked in the bank vault. However, Billy returns with the money and rescues ...

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Billy Garford, a happy-go-lucky cowboy, gambles away most of the $500 lent him by rancher J. D. Starbuck, then invests his last fifty dollars with aging prospector Jimmie Breeze. The cowboy finds work on the Starbuck ranch but is soon fired for paying too much attention to the boss’s daughter, Ollie. After Jimmie strikes gold, he and Billy take over a local bank. Ollie is hired as Billy’s secretary, much to the displeasure of Harvey Grey, a cashier who considers her to be his fiancée. Harvey takes revenge by robbing the bank, but Jimmie is the prime suspect because of his many debts. While Billy pursues Harvey, Ollie has inadvertently been locked in the bank vault. However, Billy returns with the money and rescues her.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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