Director:

King Vidor

Writer:

Elinor Glyn

Cinematographer:

John Mescall

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Louis B. Mayer Productions
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HISTORY

The 7 May 1924 FD stated that His Hour was the first of a series of several Elinor Glyn stories to be adapted to the screen for Louis B. Mayer Productions and the Metro-Goldwyn Distributing Corp. Production was completed later that summer, as reported by the 5 Aug 1924 FD. ...

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The 7 May 1924 FD stated that His Hour was the first of a series of several Elinor Glyn stories to be adapted to the screen for Louis B. Mayer Productions and the Metro-Goldwyn Distributing Corp. Production was completed later that summer, as reported by the 5 Aug 1924 FD.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
7 May 1924
p. 4
Film Daily
5 Aug 1924
p. 2
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 September 1924
Production Date:
ended late summer 1924
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Louis B. Mayer Productions
23 September 1924
LP20635
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,300
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Tamara Loraine, a beautiful young Englishwoman, is attracted to Russian Prince Gritzko, who is famed for his many romantic affairs, when she meets him in Egypt and again in Russia. Gritzko is attentive, but Tamara remains distant so as not to be numbered among his conquests. When Gritzko wins a duel and the right to accompany Tamara to a ball, she decides to return to England. On their way to the ship during a snowstorm, Gritzko maneuvers Tamara to his lodge for shelter, and she resists his advances until she collapses from exhaustion. Gritzko then leaves her alone, but in the morning Tamara finds her waist opened (Gritzko wanted to know if her heart was beating) and believes that honor dictates that she marry him. After the ceremony, the prince offers to go away until sent for, but Tamara realizes their mutual, sincere love and bids him ...

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Tamara Loraine, a beautiful young Englishwoman, is attracted to Russian Prince Gritzko, who is famed for his many romantic affairs, when she meets him in Egypt and again in Russia. Gritzko is attentive, but Tamara remains distant so as not to be numbered among his conquests. When Gritzko wins a duel and the right to accompany Tamara to a ball, she decides to return to England. On their way to the ship during a snowstorm, Gritzko maneuvers Tamara to his lodge for shelter, and she resists his advances until she collapses from exhaustion. Gritzko then leaves her alone, but in the morning Tamara finds her waist opened (Gritzko wanted to know if her heart was beating) and believes that honor dictates that she marry him. After the ceremony, the prince offers to go away until sent for, but Tamara realizes their mutual, sincere love and bids him stay.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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