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HISTORY

The 21 Aug 1926 Motion Picture News announced that Paramount Famous Lasky Corp. had signed a deal with author Elinor Glyn to produce her forthcoming film adaptations, the making of which Glyn would supervise. The first production on the slate was It, set to star Clara Bow in her first leading role. John Waters was named as the director, but he did not remain with the project.
       According to the same day’s Moving Picture World, Glyn’s It “was especially written for Hearst Newspapers to be published in serial form” preceding its publication as a novel. The 28 Jan 1927 Motion Picture News clarified that the story first appeared in the Feb 1927 issue of Cosmopolitan Magazine.
       Principal photography began on 1 Oct 1926, under the direction of Clarence Badger, as stated in the 3 Oct 1926 FD. Badger became ill during filming, and Josef von Sternberg directed some scenes during his absence.
       On 30 Nov 1926, FD announced that filming had completed. The 11 Dec 1926 Moving Picture World reported that the final scenes filmed were of the “unusual amusement park sequence.”
       According to the Jan 1927 Motion Picture Magazine, Glyn appeared onscreen in the picture. The 9 Feb 1927 Var review confirmed that Glyn made her first credited screen appearance in It, noting that she played herself in a restaurant sequence, and received billing in the film’s program as an “added attraction,” as Madame Elinor Glyn.
       The 9 Feb 1927 FD indicated that It had been released sometime ... More Less

The 21 Aug 1926 Motion Picture News announced that Paramount Famous Lasky Corp. had signed a deal with author Elinor Glyn to produce her forthcoming film adaptations, the making of which Glyn would supervise. The first production on the slate was It, set to star Clara Bow in her first leading role. John Waters was named as the director, but he did not remain with the project.
       According to the same day’s Moving Picture World, Glyn’s It “was especially written for Hearst Newspapers to be published in serial form” preceding its publication as a novel. The 28 Jan 1927 Motion Picture News clarified that the story first appeared in the Feb 1927 issue of Cosmopolitan Magazine.
       Principal photography began on 1 Oct 1926, under the direction of Clarence Badger, as stated in the 3 Oct 1926 FD. Badger became ill during filming, and Josef von Sternberg directed some scenes during his absence.
       On 30 Nov 1926, FD announced that filming had completed. The 11 Dec 1926 Moving Picture World reported that the final scenes filmed were of the “unusual amusement park sequence.”
       According to the Jan 1927 Motion Picture Magazine, Glyn appeared onscreen in the picture. The 9 Feb 1927 Var review confirmed that Glyn made her first credited screen appearance in It, noting that she played herself in a restaurant sequence, and received billing in the film’s program as an “added attraction,” as Madame Elinor Glyn.
       The 9 Feb 1927 FD indicated that It had been released sometime in Jan 1927 at the Loew’s Palace Theatre in Memphis, TN. The picture opened in New York City at the Paramount Theatre on 5 Feb 1927, as reported in the Var review.
       The 13 Feb 1927 FD review deemed It a “sprightly little yarn.” Both Var and FD praised Bow’s performance, crediting her natural “It” quality. In the wake of the film’s success, Bow became one of the biggest stars of the silent era. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
1 Sep 1926
p. 1.
Film Daily
3 Oct 1926
p. 9.
Film Daily
30 Nov 1926
p. 2.
Film Daily
9 Feb 1927
p. 11.
Film Daily
13 Feb 1927
p. 8.
Motion Picture Magazine
Jan 1927
p. 76.
Motion Picture News
21 Aug 1926
p. 670.
Motion Picture News
28 Jan 1927.
---
Moving Picture World
21 Aug 1926
p. 468.
Moving Picture World
11 Dec 1926
p. 415.
Moving Picture World
12 Feb 1927
p. 513.
New York Times
13 Feb 1927
p. 7.
Photoplay
Mar 1927
p. 54.
Variety
9 Feb 1927
p. 14.
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 February 1927
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 5 February 1927
Copyright Claimant:
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
19 February 1927
Copyright Number:
LP23686
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,452
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At Waltham's Department Store, Betty Lou and her friends see their new boss, Cyrus Waltham, who has taken over the running of his father's store. After discussing Elinor Glyn's story, "It", the girls decide that Cyrus has "it," and Betty Lou sets her sights on him. After work, she overhears Cyrus tell his friend, Monty, that he will be dining at the Ritz that evening. Betty Lou schemes an introduction to Monty, and convinces him to take her to the Ritz for dinner. When they arrive, he tries to direct her to a secluded table, but she insists on sitting at a table near Cyrus, and flirts with him from across the room throughout dinner. Before long, Betty Lou and Cyrus begin courting. Sometime later, social services threatens to take away the baby of Betty Lou's roommate, Molly, whom they deem an unfit mother. To help her friend, Betty Lou claims the child as hers, and proves that she has a job to support it. Monty and a newspaper reporter witness the dramatic event as it unfolds, and Monty vouches for Betty Lou. When Monty shows Cyrus the news item and exposes Betty Lou's deceitfulness, Cyrus snubs her. Betty Lou, unaware that Cyrus believes her to be the mother of a fatherless child, is scorned by his sudden disinterest, and quits her job. Learning of the misunderstanding from Monty, Betty Lou plots revenge, vowing to win Cyrus back and laugh in his face when he proposes ... +


At Waltham's Department Store, Betty Lou and her friends see their new boss, Cyrus Waltham, who has taken over the running of his father's store. After discussing Elinor Glyn's story, "It", the girls decide that Cyrus has "it," and Betty Lou sets her sights on him. After work, she overhears Cyrus tell his friend, Monty, that he will be dining at the Ritz that evening. Betty Lou schemes an introduction to Monty, and convinces him to take her to the Ritz for dinner. When they arrive, he tries to direct her to a secluded table, but she insists on sitting at a table near Cyrus, and flirts with him from across the room throughout dinner. Before long, Betty Lou and Cyrus begin courting. Sometime later, social services threatens to take away the baby of Betty Lou's roommate, Molly, whom they deem an unfit mother. To help her friend, Betty Lou claims the child as hers, and proves that she has a job to support it. Monty and a newspaper reporter witness the dramatic event as it unfolds, and Monty vouches for Betty Lou. When Monty shows Cyrus the news item and exposes Betty Lou's deceitfulness, Cyrus snubs her. Betty Lou, unaware that Cyrus believes her to be the mother of a fatherless child, is scorned by his sudden disinterest, and quits her job. Learning of the misunderstanding from Monty, Betty Lou plots revenge, vowing to win Cyrus back and laugh in his face when he proposes marriage. She arrives at Cyrus's yachting party as Monty's date. Although Cyrus has invited his own date, Adela Van Norman, he is smitten with Betty Lou. He overcomes his concerns that she is an unwed mother and proposes marriage, but she rejects him coldly, laughing in his face. However, Betty Lou laments her behavior, and cries on Monty's shoulder. Monty reveals the truth to Cyrus, then takes over the helm while Cyrus searches for the girl. Distracted, Monty crashes the yacht into another ship, and Betty Lou and Adela fall overboard. Betty Lou keeps her rival from drowning before Cyrus jumps in to rescue the women. As Betty Lou swims to safety, Cyrus leaves Adela in Monty's care, and pursues Betty Lou. Clinging to the anchor, Betty Lou and Cyrus share a passionate kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.