Alias the Lone Wolf (1927)

Mystery, Drama | 22 August 1927

Director:

Edward H. Griffith

Producer:

Harry Cohn

Cinematographer:

J. O. Taylor

Production Designer:

Robert E. Lee

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Cosmopolitan Productions’ acquisition of screen rights to Alias the Lone Wolf, the 1921 novel by Louis Joseph Vance, was reported in the 19 Apr 1923 Film Daily and the 28 Apr 1923 Moving Picture World. Company president William Randolph Hearst had recently arranged for a release through Goldwyn Distributing Corp. Bert Lytell, who had made his screen debut as the title character in The Lone Wolf (1917, see entry), was signed to reprise the role.
       The project remained in limbo for nearly three years, until the 24 Jan 1926 LAT announced that Lytell had purchased rights for Alias the Lone Wolf and its sequel, The Return of the Lone Wolf. Another fourteen months passed before Columbia Pictures Corp. heralded the upcoming release in the 30 Mar 1927 Film Daily. The production marked director Edward H. Griffith’s first for Columbia, as stated in the 22 Jul 1927 Motion Picture News. According to the 19 Aug 1927 issue, location scenes were shot during a two-week chartered ocean cruise off the California coast. Interior scenes were later completed at Columbia Studios in Hollywood, CA. The 30 Oct 1927 Film Daily included Chappell Dossett among the cast. The completion of principal photography was reported in the 29 Jun 1927 Var.
       Alias the Lone Wolf was released on 22 Aug 1927, followed by a mid-Sep 1927 opening at the Hippodrome Theatre in New York City, and an early Nov 1927 opening at Loew’s State Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. ...

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Cosmopolitan Productions’ acquisition of screen rights to Alias the Lone Wolf, the 1921 novel by Louis Joseph Vance, was reported in the 19 Apr 1923 Film Daily and the 28 Apr 1923 Moving Picture World. Company president William Randolph Hearst had recently arranged for a release through Goldwyn Distributing Corp. Bert Lytell, who had made his screen debut as the title character in The Lone Wolf (1917, see entry), was signed to reprise the role.
       The project remained in limbo for nearly three years, until the 24 Jan 1926 LAT announced that Lytell had purchased rights for Alias the Lone Wolf and its sequel, The Return of the Lone Wolf. Another fourteen months passed before Columbia Pictures Corp. heralded the upcoming release in the 30 Mar 1927 Film Daily. The production marked director Edward H. Griffith’s first for Columbia, as stated in the 22 Jul 1927 Motion Picture News. According to the 19 Aug 1927 issue, location scenes were shot during a two-week chartered ocean cruise off the California coast. Interior scenes were later completed at Columbia Studios in Hollywood, CA. The 30 Oct 1927 Film Daily included Chappell Dossett among the cast. The completion of principal photography was reported in the 29 Jun 1927 Var.
       Alias the Lone Wolf was released on 22 Aug 1927, followed by a mid-Sep 1927 opening at the Hippodrome Theatre in New York City, and an early Nov 1927 opening at Loew’s State Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. The 25 Sep 1927 LAT congratulated the director for “not having one passenger in his steamship sequence stagger to the rail in the interests of comic relief.”
       “The Lone Wolf” was also the title given to safecracker Frank Killilea, whose arrest was reported in the 13 Dec 1925 LAT.
       For information on other films featuring Louis Joseph Vance's character, please consult the entry for the 1939 Columbia picture The Lone Wolf Spy Hunt, directed by Peter Godfrey and starring Warren William and Ida Lupino, and search the series name in Advanced Search.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Educational Screen
Nov 1927
p. 430
Film Daily
19 Apr 1923
---
Film Daily
30 Mar 1927
p. 7
Film Daily
19 Sep 1927
p. 3
Film Daily
2 Oct 1927
---
Film Daily
10 Oct 1927
p. 8
Film Daily
16 Oct 1927
p. 8
Film Daily
30 Oct 1927
p. 15
Harrison's Reports
19 Nov 1927
---
Los Angeles Times
24 Jan 1926
p. 76
Los Angeles Times
25 Sep 1927
p. 51
Los Angeles Times
13 Dec 1925
p. 23
Motion Picture News
22 Jul 1927
p. 215
Motion Picture News
19 Aug 1927
p. 543
Moving Picture World
28 Apr 1923
p. 910
MPN Booking Guide
Oct 1927
p. 20
New York Times
20 Sep 1927
p. 32
Photoplay
Jan 1928
p. 122
Variety
29 Jun 1927
p. 14
Variety
5 Oct 1927
p. 25
Variety
9 Nov 1927
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel, Alias the Lone Wolf by Louis Joseph Vance (Garden City, NY, 1921).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
22 August 1927
Premiere Information:
New York opening: mid-Sep 1927; Los Angeles opening: early Nov 1927
Production Date:
ended late Jun 1927
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp.
14 September 1927
LP24404
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,843
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Eve de Montalais crosses the Atlantic Ocean with plans to smuggle her jewels into the U.S. Also aboard the ship is Michael Lanyard, a reformed jewel thief known as “The Lone Wolf,” and a criminal gang that includes Liane Delorme among its members. Eve seeks Michael’s aid in getting the gems past customs officials, then learns his true identity after their arrival in New York City. A thief named Whitaker Monk assumes the role of a customs officer and induces Eve to turn over the jewels, but she escapes with them upon discovering the deception. Michael is overpowered by the gang but manages to free himself and declares the jewels to customs officials. After the criminals are arrested, Eve is relieved to learn that Michael is a Secret Service ...

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Eve de Montalais crosses the Atlantic Ocean with plans to smuggle her jewels into the U.S. Also aboard the ship is Michael Lanyard, a reformed jewel thief known as “The Lone Wolf,” and a criminal gang that includes Liane Delorme among its members. Eve seeks Michael’s aid in getting the gems past customs officials, then learns his true identity after their arrival in New York City. A thief named Whitaker Monk assumes the role of a customs officer and induces Eve to turn over the jewels, but she escapes with them upon discovering the deception. Michael is overpowered by the gang but manages to free himself and declares the jewels to customs officials. After the criminals are arrested, Eve is relieved to learn that Michael is a Secret Service agent.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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