No Sad Songs for Me (1950)

87 or 89 mins | Melodrama | May 1950

Director:

Rudolph Maté

Writer:

Howard W. Koch

Producer:

Buddy Adler

Cinematographer:

Joseph Walker

Editor:

William Lyon

Production Designer:

Cary Odell

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

This picture marked Margaret Sullavan's last film appearance and her first since Cry Havoc in 1943 (see entry). According to an 11 Jan 1944 LAEx news item, Victor Saville was slated to direct the film shortly after Columbia's purchase of the Ruth Southard novel. A 21 Aug 1946 HR news item noted that Casey Robinson would produce and write the film, and Irene Dunne would star in it. In Jun 1949, HR reported that Sam Wood had been signed to direct the film. Wendell Corey was loaned to Columbia by Hal Wallis' company. Some scenes were shot on location in Ontario, CA, near Los Angeles. George Duning's musical score was nominated for an Academy Award. ...

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This picture marked Margaret Sullavan's last film appearance and her first since Cry Havoc in 1943 (see entry). According to an 11 Jan 1944 LAEx news item, Victor Saville was slated to direct the film shortly after Columbia's purchase of the Ruth Southard novel. A 21 Aug 1946 HR news item noted that Casey Robinson would produce and write the film, and Irene Dunne would star in it. In Jun 1949, HR reported that Sam Wood had been signed to direct the film. Wendell Corey was loaned to Columbia by Hal Wallis' company. Some scenes were shot on location in Ontario, CA, near Los Angeles. George Duning's musical score was nominated for an Academy Award.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 Apr 1950
---
Daily Variety
12 Apr 1950
p. 5
Film Daily
12 Apr 1950
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
21 Aug 1946
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 1949
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Apr 1950
p. 3
Los Angeles Examiner
11 Jan 1944
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
15 Apr 1950
pp. 261-62
New York Times
28 Apr 1950
p. 26
Variety
12 Apr 1950
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Howard Koch
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Cary O'Dell
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
Morris Stoloff
Mus dir
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair styles
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel No Sad Songs for Me by Ruth Southard (New York, 1944).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
May 1950
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 27 Apr 1950
Production Date:
13 Oct--19 Nov 1949
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp.
31 May 1950
LP326
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
87 or 89
Length(in feet):
7,949
Country:
United States
PCA No:
14199
SYNOPSIS

When Mary Scott learns that she has cancer and has less than a year to live, she asks her doctor, Ralph Frene, not to tell her husband Bradford and daughter Polly. As Christmas approaches, Mary becomes particularly aware of how quickly time is passing, but still does not tell Brad of her illness. On New Year's Eve, Mary and Brad invite Brad's new draftsman, Chris Radna, to attend a party with them. Brad is pleasantly surprised when, for the first time, he sees Chris wearing a beautiful dress, rather than her usual sturdy trousers and jacket. At the party, Brad dances often with Chris, causing some of the women to gossip about them. Realizing that Chris and Brad are falling in love, Mary decides to visit her father in San Francisco, but Mary is unable to tell him about her illness. She later meets an old friend, now a widower, and the woman he is currently dating. Mary's dislike of the woman spurs her to consider what will happen to Brad and Polly after she dies. Mary arrives home and, believing that Brad no longer loves her, considers suicide. Later that evening, Brad tells Mary that he had an affair with Chris, but has ended it and adds that Chris is leaving town. Secretly, Mary visits Chris, who apologizes for her affair with Brad, explaining that her own husband died during the war and, until she met Brad, she had believed that she would never love anyone again. Mary intends for Brad to marry Chris, a woman she likes, after her death and starts to include her in their lives, ...

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When Mary Scott learns that she has cancer and has less than a year to live, she asks her doctor, Ralph Frene, not to tell her husband Bradford and daughter Polly. As Christmas approaches, Mary becomes particularly aware of how quickly time is passing, but still does not tell Brad of her illness. On New Year's Eve, Mary and Brad invite Brad's new draftsman, Chris Radna, to attend a party with them. Brad is pleasantly surprised when, for the first time, he sees Chris wearing a beautiful dress, rather than her usual sturdy trousers and jacket. At the party, Brad dances often with Chris, causing some of the women to gossip about them. Realizing that Chris and Brad are falling in love, Mary decides to visit her father in San Francisco, but Mary is unable to tell him about her illness. She later meets an old friend, now a widower, and the woman he is currently dating. Mary's dislike of the woman spurs her to consider what will happen to Brad and Polly after she dies. Mary arrives home and, believing that Brad no longer loves her, considers suicide. Later that evening, Brad tells Mary that he had an affair with Chris, but has ended it and adds that Chris is leaving town. Secretly, Mary visits Chris, who apologizes for her affair with Brad, explaining that her own husband died during the war and, until she met Brad, she had believed that she would never love anyone again. Mary intends for Brad to marry Chris, a woman she likes, after her death and starts to include her in their lives, introducing her to friends and allowing her to make friends with Polly. When Brad accidentally finds Mary's pain pills, he calls Ralph and finally learns of her approaching death. Without telling her, he decides to make the remaining weeks of Mary's life as wonderful as he can. Thanks to his efforts, Mary enjoys a brief idyll with Brad in Mexico before she dies.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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