Affair in Monte Carlo (1953)

74-75 mins | Romance | 23 August 1953

Director:

Victor Saville

Producer:

Ivan Foxwell

Cinematographer:

Christopher Challis

Editor:

Richard Best

Production Designer:

Terence Verity

Production Companies:

Associated British-Pathé, Ltd., Allied Artists Productions, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

Opening and closing cast credits differ in order. The working titles of this film were Just For the Night, The Monte Carlo Affair and Twenty-Four Hours in a Woman's Life. The film was initially released in Great Britain in 1952 under the title 24 Hours in a Woman's Life. The British release ran for 90 minutes at a length of 8,070 feet, and included scenes featuring the Antibes hotel owner's fiancée, "Henriette," played by Yvonne Scatcherd, and "Georges," played by Pierre Le Fevre, the hotel guest with whom she falls in love and runs away. According to information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, early versions of the script depicted the character "Linda Venning" as being a married woman having an affair. As noted by contemporary sources, the film was partially shot on location in Monte Carlo, with interiors being filmed at the Associated British Studios in Elstree, England. ...

More Less

Opening and closing cast credits differ in order. The working titles of this film were Just For the Night, The Monte Carlo Affair and Twenty-Four Hours in a Woman's Life. The film was initially released in Great Britain in 1952 under the title 24 Hours in a Woman's Life. The British release ran for 90 minutes at a length of 8,070 feet, and included scenes featuring the Antibes hotel owner's fiancée, "Henriette," played by Yvonne Scatcherd, and "Georges," played by Pierre Le Fevre, the hotel guest with whom she falls in love and runs away. According to information in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, early versions of the script depicted the character "Linda Venning" as being a married woman having an affair. As noted by contemporary sources, the film was partially shot on location in Monte Carlo, with interiors being filmed at the Associated British Studios in Elstree, England.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Sep 1953
---
Daily Variety
22 Sep 1952
---
Daily Variety
26 Jun 1953
---
Daily Variety
9 Sep 1953
---
Harrison's Reports
19 Sep 1953
p. 151
Hollywood Citizen-News
19 Oct 1951
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Aug 1951
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 1951
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
19 Oct 1951
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
1 Nov 1951
p. 8
Los Angeles Times
12 Sep 1953
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Sep 1953
p. 1998
Variety
17 Sep 1952
p. 22
Variety
26 Jun 1953
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SOUND
Rec eng
MAKEUP
Hair styles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scenario ed
Casting dir
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Four and Twenty Hours in a Woman's Life by Stefan Zweig in Conflicts; Three Tales Translated (New York, 1927).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"I've Got a Lovely Bunch of Coconuts," music and lyrics by Fred Heatherton.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Just For the Night
The Monte Carlo Affair
Twenty-Four Hours in a Woman's Life
Release Date:
23 August 1953
Production Date:
20 Aug--30 Oct 1951 at Associated British Picture Corp. Studios, Elstree, England
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Monogram Pictures Corp.
11 September 1952
LP2998
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
74-75
Length(in feet):
6,709
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
16341
SYNOPSIS

At a small seaside hotel in Antibes, France, proprietor Monsieur Blanc returns from his wedding preparations to learn that his young fiancée has left him for a man she met the day before. Hotel guests are shocked and skeptical about the sudden romance, all except for American author Robert Stirling, as he has witnessed love-at-first-sight. He agrees to tell the story after securing his friends’s promises they will reconsider the fiancée’s case afterward. Robert relates that his story occurred before the war, when he anchored his yacht off Monte Carlo: Among the guests on Robert’s yacht are his young cousin, Peter, who always brings uninvited guests aboard, film director Frank Brown and his wife Alice, and Linda Venning, a beautiful British widow whose husband had been a close friend of Robert. Robert administers the Venning estate while Linda continues her charitable work at home. Although Peter flirts with Linda, she is indifferent, but later that evening agrees to join Robert at the casino. As it is her first time at the casino, Robert encourages Linda to closely watch the gamblers’ hands because they reveal stories. Linda is riveted by a young man whose hands reveal a deep anxiety as he loses. She follows the young man outside and, convinced that he is suicidal, urges him to step away from a bridge that overlooks the train tracks. When the young man reveals that he has no home or money, Linda rents him a room at a pension. The young man initially sneers at Linda’s attempts to help him, but finally acknowledges that he is alone. Linda spends the night in ...

More Less

At a small seaside hotel in Antibes, France, proprietor Monsieur Blanc returns from his wedding preparations to learn that his young fiancée has left him for a man she met the day before. Hotel guests are shocked and skeptical about the sudden romance, all except for American author Robert Stirling, as he has witnessed love-at-first-sight. He agrees to tell the story after securing his friends’s promises they will reconsider the fiancée’s case afterward. Robert relates that his story occurred before the war, when he anchored his yacht off Monte Carlo: Among the guests on Robert’s yacht are his young cousin, Peter, who always brings uninvited guests aboard, film director Frank Brown and his wife Alice, and Linda Venning, a beautiful British widow whose husband had been a close friend of Robert. Robert administers the Venning estate while Linda continues her charitable work at home. Although Peter flirts with Linda, she is indifferent, but later that evening agrees to join Robert at the casino. As it is her first time at the casino, Robert encourages Linda to closely watch the gamblers’ hands because they reveal stories. Linda is riveted by a young man whose hands reveal a deep anxiety as he loses. She follows the young man outside and, convinced that he is suicidal, urges him to step away from a bridge that overlooks the train tracks. When the young man reveals that he has no home or money, Linda rents him a room at a pension. The young man initially sneers at Linda’s attempts to help him, but finally acknowledges that he is alone. Linda spends the night in the young man’s room and overhears his desperate cries about a pair of diamond earrings. The next morning, she asks him about the earrings, and learns that he stole them from his aunt in Paris. The young man relates that his gambling habit started in his youth at his father’s horse racing stable, and ruined his college career. The young man admits that the gambling is a disease; he is now desperate because he cannot afford to buy back his aunt’s earrings from a pawn broker. Linda is overwhelmed by the enormity of the young man’s problems and returns to the yacht. There she confides in Robert, asking him for a loan so she can help the young man out of debt. Linda locates the young man at the casino, where he reveals he has written a final letter to his father. She presses the money on him and urges him to retrieve the earrings and reform. The young man is rejuvenated by Linda’s affection and they spend the afternoon touring the mountains. At a mountain chapel they are befriended by L’Abbe Benoit, a famed composer, and his mother. Inside the church, the young man makes a solemn vow to quit gambling. Benoit perceives that the couple is in love and accompanies them in their carriage back to town. When the young man steps out to buy his train ticket back to Paris, Linda confesses that she does not see happiness in their future, and she leaves without saying goodbye. The priest consoles the distraught young man, advising him that Linda only desires for his reformation as re-payment. Back on the yacht, however, Linda regrets leaving the young man and, gathering a few personal items, makes a dash for the train. Linda arrives at the station just as it pulls out and, after making a stop in the chapel to pray, returns to the casino. She is stunned to find the young man back at the roulette table. The young man is enjoying a winning streak, and when Linda begs him to leave and reminds him of his vow, he angrily shouts that she should leave him alone and throws his money at her. Robert witnesses the scene and escorts Linda out of the casino. Now back in Antibes, Robert notes that Linda tried to return to the young man but he had committed suicide. M. Blanc appears with a tray of drinks in order to drink to his former fiancée’s happiness, and shortly afterward, Robert happily greets his wife, Linda, as she arrives.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

The Symbol of the Unconquered

This black independent film was shot in Fort Lee, NJ, under the working title The Wilderness Trail. A 6 Nov 1920 Moving Picture World item ... >>

The Last of the Secret Agents?

The 29 Jun 1965 LAT announced the picture as the first to star the comedy duo of Marty Allen and Steve Rossi. It also marked the ... >>

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Anita Loos's popular novella depicting the adventures of "Lorelei Lee" and "Dorothy Shaw" first appeared as a serial in Harper's Bazaar (Mar--Aug 1925) under the title ... >>

Duel in the Sun

Niven Busch's novel was purchased by RKO in 1944. According to a 16 Nov 1944 HR news item, the studio intended to star John Wayne and ... >>

Mystery in Mexico

HR news items add the following information about the production: In Jan 1947, RKO announced that the film was to be a "bi-lingual" release, produced by J. ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.