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HISTORY

The first verified performance of Michael Morton's play was on 2 Mar 1921 in Schenectady, NY. According to reviews and ads in various newspapers, Willette Kershaw, who appeared in the London production of the play, had starred in the American production. The play was presented in Pittsburgh, Chicago and possibly other American cities before moving to London.
       Woman to Woman was shot in Hollywood, according to contemporary sources, as a co-production of British companies Gainsborough Pictures and Burlington Productions and American company Tiffany-Stahl, which also distributed the picture in the U.S. Reviews reported that at least two songs were performed by Betty Compson in the film, but neither their titles nor composers have been determined.
       A 1923 silent film adaptation of the play was produced in Britain by Michael Balcon and Victor Saville and directed by Graham Cutts. Also entitled Woman to Woman, that picture marked the first feature film of Alfred Hitchcock, who adapted the play and served as an assistant director and art director. Compson also portrayed the lead character in the 1923 film, which co-starred Clive Brook.
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The first verified performance of Michael Morton's play was on 2 Mar 1921 in Schenectady, NY. According to reviews and ads in various newspapers, Willette Kershaw, who appeared in the London production of the play, had starred in the American production. The play was presented in Pittsburgh, Chicago and possibly other American cities before moving to London.
       Woman to Woman was shot in Hollywood, according to contemporary sources, as a co-production of British companies Gainsborough Pictures and Burlington Productions and American company Tiffany-Stahl, which also distributed the picture in the U.S. Reviews reported that at least two songs were performed by Betty Compson in the film, but neither their titles nor composers have been determined.
       A 1923 silent film adaptation of the play was produced in Britain by Michael Balcon and Victor Saville and directed by Graham Cutts. Also entitled Woman to Woman, that picture marked the first feature film of Alfred Hitchcock, who adapted the play and served as an assistant director and art director. Compson also portrayed the lead character in the 1923 film, which co-starred Clive Brook.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Bioscope
20 Nov 1929
p. 30
Film Daily
17 Nov 1929
---
Film Spectator
16 Nov 1929
p. 30
Kinematograph Weekly
21 Nov 1929
p. 33
Los Angeles Times
10 Nov 1929
p. 23
Los Angeles Times
8 Dec 1929
p. D4
New York Times
12 Nov 1929
p. 34
Variety
13 Nov 1929
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Tiffany Tone Production
A Tiffany-Gainsborough-Burlington Film
A Victor Saville Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Woman to Woman by Michael Morton (London 8 Sep 1921).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
1929
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 10 Nov 1929; New York opening: 11 Nov 1929
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Tiffany-Stahl Productions, Inc.
14 October 1929
LP768
Physical Properties:
Sound
Synchronized by RCA Photophone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
8,065
Length(in reels):
9
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

When English soldier David Halford is on leave in Paris during World War I, he meets and falls in love with a dancer named Lola. After the two spend the night together, David must return to his unit, but promises to come back for Lola. On the way to fulfill his promise of arranging for their marriage, David is badly injured by an enemy shell and loses his memory. Several years after the war, David, now a wealthy London businessman, has returned to his old life but remembers nothing about Lola. He marries Vesta, a woman of his own class, who loves him but is unable to have a child. Unknown to David, Lola gave birth to his son, Davey, and to support them, became a successful stage performer. When she travels to London, David and Vesta attend one of her shows, where David, hearing Lola sing a song that she sang during the war, suddenly recalls his lost love. David is wracked with guilt over Lola and his son, but also feels loyalty to Vesta. In the end, Vesta and Lola decide, woman-to-woman, that Davey should go to live with David and Vesta. After giving up her child, Lola goes on stage, where she dies during the ...

More Less

When English soldier David Halford is on leave in Paris during World War I, he meets and falls in love with a dancer named Lola. After the two spend the night together, David must return to his unit, but promises to come back for Lola. On the way to fulfill his promise of arranging for their marriage, David is badly injured by an enemy shell and loses his memory. Several years after the war, David, now a wealthy London businessman, has returned to his old life but remembers nothing about Lola. He marries Vesta, a woman of his own class, who loves him but is unable to have a child. Unknown to David, Lola gave birth to his son, Davey, and to support them, became a successful stage performer. When she travels to London, David and Vesta attend one of her shows, where David, hearing Lola sing a song that she sang during the war, suddenly recalls his lost love. David is wracked with guilt over Lola and his son, but also feels loyalty to Vesta. In the end, Vesta and Lola decide, woman-to-woman, that Davey should go to live with David and Vesta. After giving up her child, Lola goes on stage, where she dies during the performance.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.